The Brattleboro Reformer has many colleagues around the country producing news for our "sister" papers. The Daily DFM is a "top picks" of today's national news. Consider it a collection of "things you should know, today."

1. What we know 6 days after Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines

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2. Supreme court considers apartment searches

By Maggie Clark

The US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, November 6, 2013.

The US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, November 6, 2013. Sail Loeb/AFP/Getty

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday considered whether police should be allowed to search an apartment if one resident says 'no' and leaves the home, but a roommate says 'yes.'

The case, which stems from a gang-related robbery in California, could have broad implications for anyone living in an apartment, and potentially create new state guidelines for police officers investigating crimes. The decision could also settle disagreements on searches between state and federal courts in California, Colorado, Wisconsin, New York, Michigan, Oregon and the District of Columbia.

On October 12, 2009, the Los Angeles Police got a tip that Walter Fernandez, a suspected member of a gang known as the Drifters, had assaulted another man and had fled back to his apartment. When officers got to the apartment, they heard screaming and fighting through the front door.

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3. 'Tabata' will put a burst in your training

By Danielle Douglas/The Washington Post

Damian Warner, a top decathlete in Canada, demonstrates a lunge.

Damian Warner, a top decathlete in Canada, demonstrates a lunge. Rene Johnston/Getty Images/Toronto Star

Here's an important word for your body to learn: "Tabata."

It's the name of a form of interval training that relies on a simple pattern of 20 seconds of exercise followed by 10 seconds of rest. That doesn't sound so bad, but once you repeat the cycle eight times - a standard round of Tabata - it can be enough to make you see stars.

The technique is named for researcher Izumi Tabata, who studied the protocol while working with the Japanese speedskating team in the 1990s. He found that the head coach's favorite routine, which involved short bursts of exercise followed by short periods of rest, improved athletes' metabolism, strength and endurance.

When the study was published, word of the benefits got out, and now gyms around the world are embracing Tabata. The American Council on Exercise recently conducted its own Tabata study and deemed that even a 20-minute routine was strenuous enough to qualify as an effective cardiovascular workout. (And subjects burned between 240 and 360 calories in that short session.)

Inspired by such impressive numbers, Leslie LaPlace, a certified trainer in Arlington, Va., launched a Tabata boot camp (powerofmovement.co) in January. Classes meet two or three times a week in small groups, and students also receive six-minute daily online workouts to do on off-days.

"Many of my clients struggle with finding time to commit to an exercise program," LaPlace says. "Tabata offered effective workouts and high caloric burn without spending an hour in a gym doing boring cardio or the same weight routine."

Tabata timing is strict, but when it comes to exercises, almost any move works, which gives instructors leeway on what they can incorporate into a workout.

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4. 5 things you missed: Netflix redesign and more

5. Millions of Americans still lack Internet access

By Andrea Peterson/The Washington Post

Jim Crawford preps a mower to use to clean up some brush on his property in Manhattan, Kan. Crawford says his 10-acre ranch keeps him busy enough and he doesn't need to get online. He is among the 15 percent of Americans older than 18 who don't use the internet.

Jim Crawford preps a mower to use to clean up some brush on his property in Manhattan, Kan. Crawford says his 10-acre ranch keeps him busy enough and he doesn't need to get online. He is among the 15 percent of Americans older than 18 who don't use the internet. Steve Hebert/The Washington Post

Sixty-three years old and retired from a career as a welder, Jim Crawford doesn't have much use for the Internet.

"I never had to use it on the job and didn't have to use it at home for any reason," said Crawford, who lives in Manhattan, Kan. "So I never really learned to do it - and never really got interested."

The only time he goes online is to read through the automotive listings in the office of a local online auction company. If he sees something he likes, he says, he asks his mechanic to bid on it for him.

Crawford is far from alone: About 15 percent of Americans older than 18 don't use the Internet, according to a study released in September by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. An additional 9 percent use it only outside the home.

They make up a shrinking, but not insignificant, segment of the population. And the gap between them and our increasingly digitized society is growing wider every day.

"There is a group of Americans being left behind as technology advances without them," Lawrence Strickling, head of the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration, told an audience at the Brookings Institution recently. "Americans who don't have access to the Internet are increasingly cut off from job opportunities, educational resources, health-care information, social networks, even government services."

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6. Bidder, bank at odds over Four Columns' fate

By MIKE FAHER / Reformer Staff

The Four Columns Inn in Newfane. (Kayla Rice/Reformer)

NEWFANE -- Tony Amato had hoped that he would soon be handed the keys to a Newfane landmark.

Instead, the Maryland man took a substantial sum of cash and left Vermont frustrated this week, angry that his planned purchase of the shuttered Four Columns Inn had fallen through.

Amato contends Peoples United Bank, which purchased the property at auction last month, "stonewalled" him and behaved in a way that "defies logic" just as the deal was about to be sealed.

"We're the only people who were looking at buying that property. We'd done everything," Amato said of himself and his wife, Jill. "Now, they're starting from scratch."

But Peoples United administrators dispute that, with an executive saying Wednesday that the bank had made an "extraordinarily fair" offer and now will put the inn on the market.

"We see it as the community sees it -- as a very vital, important asset in the community," said Michael Seaver, the bank's Vermont president. "We want to find a new owner for that as soon as possible so that it can be reopened."

The Four Columns was constructed in 1832. The West Street property, which includes a main building, a reception/restaurant building and a residence/office, last was operated by Bruce and Debbie Pfander.

But the Pfanders, who bought the property in 2004, closed the inn earlier this year. And Peoples United, which had held the Pfanders' mortgage , foreclosed and scheduled a public auction in October.

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