BRATTLEBORO -- Within 10 minutes of seeing snowboards that were in part given as Christmas presents, the items were gone, says Kelly Boyce.

Officers from the Brattleboro Police Department showed up to her residence at 88 Central Street, where the snowboards were last seen in the hallway of the apartment complex on Christmas day.

While waiting for the new owners of the snowboards to return, Boyce was in and out of her apartment. Then, the snowboards disappeared. She told the Reformer that three teenage boys have been walking the streets looking for the boards since they disappeared.

"I'm still on the search for these boards," she added. "I'm hoping they're still in the area."

The equipment is described as three snowboards with Burton custom bindings. Two of the models were made by Burton and the other one by Lamar.

Boyce posted pictures of the products on her public Facebook page. There was a blue Burton snowboard with a silver stomp pad. The bottom of it is orange. It has black bindings. The other Burton snowboard is black and red. The Lamar snowboard is black and white with a gas mask sticker on it and Burton stomp pad.

The police arrived within five minutes of being alerted, said Boyce. One officer circled the area looking for possible suspects.

She gave police her statement and the theft is currently under investigation.

Brattleboro Police Chief Eugene Wrinn told the Reformer that the police department has not recently received many complaints for stolen sports equipment.


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"Many thefts that we investigate are thefts of opportunity," he said. "We would encourage anyone to secure valuable property from being accessible for theft."

When it comes to investigating a theft such as the snowboards, Wrinn says the department has various methods to attempt to find stolen property if enough information is provided.

Boyce planned to visit local sporting goods stores on Monday to check if anyone had sold the snowboards. She also wanted to make owners or managers of those shops aware of the stolen products.

"It's pretty devastating," said Boyce. "These are teenage kids' Christmas gifts."

Chris Mays can be reached at 802-254-2311, ext. 273, or cmays@reformer.com. Follow Chris on Twitter @CMaysReformer.