The lot on Main St. in Hinsdale, N.H., where the new police department will be built. (Kayla Rice/Reformer)
The lot on Main St. in Hinsdale, N.H., where the new police department will be built. (Kayla Rice/Reformer)

HINSDALE, N.H. -- The town is now set to move forward on the development of a police station it has needed since the 1980s.

The Hinsdale Board of Selectmen on Tuesday signed a $773,000 bond for the complete construction of a new station and sent the paperwork back to the New Hampshire Municipal Bond Bank. Selectmen Chairman Bernie Rideout said the 20-year bond came with a very low interest rate that he is very happy with, though he could not recall the exact figure. He said the bond had to be signed and returned to the bond bank by June 2, and it is a relief to have it completed.

The project is being developed by Swanzey-based Ingram Construction Corp. Taxpayers voted at Town Meeting 2013 to appropriate nearly $1.1 million for the project. The design of the new station has been crafted by architects Peter Tennant, of Manchester-based Tennant/Wallace Architects. Ingram's website said the new station will be a 3,828-square-foot building. Ingram is also the company working on the Hilltop Montessori School project in Brattleboro, according to the website.

The Hinsdale Police Department has been operating out of a temporary facility on River Road since the early 1980s and is in dire need of a new station. The department's new home will be built at 8-12 Main St., where town officials plan to create a 0.53-acre lot. The town had been searching for a location for a new station, and resident Lewis Major, owner of the building at 8-10 Main St., which housed a convenience store and an uninhabited apartment, donated his property to the town after it was severely damaged in a fire in August 2012. The selectmen later signed a purchase and sales agreement for $38,000 with the owner of the abutting property at 12 Main St., which used to be a veterinary clinic., and combined the two land parcels.

The project hit a snag when town officials conducted a title search and found out the property line had been changed in the deed around 1909. This forced a meeting between the town and the building's abutters, which included property owner Andy Shapiro, to decide where to set a boundary and all parties agreed to keep it in the same spot. The purchase of 12 Main St. for $38,000 was supposed to take place the first week of July 2013, but was put on hiatus until the matter was resolved.

The demolition at 8-12 Main St. began on Dec. 2 and was performed by Triple T Trucking, Inc. Town Administrator Jill Collins told the Reformer Catamount Environmental Inc. safely removed all asbestos from Major's former building before demolition.

Rideout said everything is going smoothly and the town should in the summer get a projection of when to expect completion.

Domenic Poli can be reached at dpoli@reformer.com, or 802-254-2311, ext. 277. You can follow him on Twitter @dpoli_reformer.