IBIT Dance Company presents
March 29 performance, gala benefit

BRATTLEBORO -- IBIT Dance Company’s first-ever spring tour wraps up with a performance and gala benefit event in its homewtown of Brattleboro on Saturday, March 29.

After performances March 27 in Hadley, Mass., and March 28 in Cambridge, Mass,, IBIT, a modern dance company which offers pre-professional training for committed area students ages 12-24, returns home on March 29 for a performance at 4:30 p.m., at the Latchis Theatre, followed by a Bring in the Spring Benefit starting at 6:45 p.m., at the River Garden.

The performance features original choreography by IBIT Dance Company Director Brenda Siegel, Donlin Foreman and Billbob Brown, as well as IBIT student Tasha Warshaw. Tickets are $16, $12 for students.

The benefit includes hors d’oeuvres, a silent auction, a photo exhibit and live jazz by David Ross and Friends. Tickets for the benefit are $35 at www.IBITdance.com in advance (that price includes admission to the Latchis performance) or $40 at the door. Proceeds benefit the IBIT Dance scholarship fund.

Here’s the poop: Rich Earth Institute welcomes comedian for evening of laughs and learning

BRATTLEBORO -- The Rich Earth Institute will present an evening of fun and education with artist comedian and sustainability activist Shawn Shafner on Friday, March 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. The free event will take place at the River Garden. The event includes hors d’oeuvres, interactive activities for all ages, door prizes, urine donor recognition and an update on Rich Earth Institute’s accomplishments.

Shafner is founder of The People’s Own Organic Power Project (The POOP Project), a grassroots organization that has been inspiring conversations about sustainable sanitation throughout New York City and internationally since 2010. Shafner has performed at Madison Square Garden and on the floor of the United Nations. He is working on a documentary, "Flush," and a musical, "An Inconvenient Poop."

Shafner’s performance is a kickoff for the 2014 Urine Brigade of the Rich Earth Institute, a local non-profit founded in 2011 to advance and promote the use of human waste as an environmental resource.

To conduct this year’s research, the institute is collecting 6,000 gallons of urine. This will be used to fertilize hay on local farms involved in the research. The organization is working to shift thinking about waste and to close the nutrient cycle by using urine to replenish soils. The Institute is featured in an article in the current issue of National Geographic: "Is ‘Peecycling’ the Next Wave in Sustainable Living?"

For more information about the event and how to become a urine donor, visit www.richearthinstitute.org or call 802-579-1857.