Las Vegas cop killers had anti-government views, were kicked off Nevada ranch of Cliven Bundy

LAS VEGAS (AP) -- A husband and wife who went on a deadly shooting rampage in Las Vegas harbored anti-government beliefs and left a swastika and a "Don’t tread on me" flag on the body of one of the two police officers they killed, authorities said Monday.

Jerad and Amanda Miller had been kicked off a Nevada ranch where anti-government protesters faced down federal agents earlier this year because they were "very radical," according to the son of rancher Cliven Bundy.

Assistant Sheriff Kevin McMahill said the Millers had ideology shared by "militia and white supremacists," including the belief that law enforcement was the "oppressor."

Police believe the shootings were an isolated act, not part of a broader conspiracy to target law enforcement, McMahill said.

Ammon Bundy, one of Cliven Bundy’s sons, said by telephone that the Millers were at his father’s ranch for a few days this spring before they were asked to leave by militia members for unspecified "conduct" problems. He called the couple "very radical" and said they "did not align themselves" with the beliefs of other protesters, who thwarted a roundup of Cliven Bundy’s cattle by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, which wants to collect more than $1 million in grazing fees and penalties.

Scientists seeking healthy seniors at risk of Alzheimer’s in bid to thwart disease

WASHINGTON (AP) -- In one of the most ambitious attempts yet to thwart Alzheimer’s disease, a major study got underway Monday to see if an experimental drug can protect healthy seniors whose brains harbor silent signs that they’re at risk.

Scientists plan to eventually scan the brains of thousands of older volunteers in the U.S., Canada and Australia to find those with a sticky build-up believed to play a key role in development of Alzheimer’s -- the first time so many people without memory problems get the chance to learn the potentially troubling news.

Having lots of that gunky protein called beta-amyloid doesn’t guarantee someone will get sick. But the big question: Could intervening so early make a difference for those who do?

"We have to get them at the stage when we can save their brains," said Dr. Reisa Sperling of Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, who is leading the huge effort to find out.

Researchers are just beginning to recruit volunteers, and on Monday, a Rhode Island man was hooked up for an IV infusion at Butler Hospital in Providence, the first treated.

Airport attack poses stark challenge for Pakistan’s government as militants vow more violence

KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) -- The Pakistani Taliban threatened more violence Monday after a five-hour assault on the nation’s busiest airport killed 29 people -- including all 10 attackers -- raising a new challenge for a U.S. ally trying to end years of fighting that has claimed thousands of lives.

With recently started peace efforts stalled, the cautious government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif may be dragged closer to a decision on whether to take on the militants in earnest across a country with a long history of ambiguity when it comes to dealing with militancy.

A further weakening of stability in the nuclear power whose tribal regions are already a hotbed of foment could ripple to neighboring Afghanistan as international combat forces prepare to withdraw from that country.

"Everywhere is a threat," warned Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan. "Every area is a target, every building is a potential target."

Such an attack in Karachi, Pakistan’s business center, will likely discourage foreign investment at a time when its economy is struggling.

String of sexual assaults during inauguration celebrations sparks
outrage in Egypt

CAIRO (AP) -- A string of sexual assaults on women during celebrations of Egypt’s presidential inauguration -- including a mass attack on a 19-year-old student who was stripped in Cairo’s Tahrir Square -- prompted outrage Monday as a video emerged purportedly showing the teenager, bloodied and naked, surrounded by dozens of men.

Seven men were arrested in connection with the assault and police were investigating 27 other complaints of sexual harassment against women during Sunday’s rallies by tens of thousands of people celebrating Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi’s inauguration late into the night, security officials said.

Sexual violence has increasingly plagued large gatherings during the past three years of turmoil following the 2011 uprising that ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak, and women’s groups complained Monday that tough new laws have not done enough.

Twenty-nine women’s rights groups released a joint statement accusing the government of failing do enough to address the spiraling outbreak of mob attacks on women. The groups said they had documented more than 250 cases of "mass sexual rape and mass sexual assaults" from November 2012 to January 2014.

Prosecutor: Trucker in crash that injured Tracy Morgan hadn’t slept for more than 24 hours

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) -- A truck driver accused of triggering a highway crash that injured Tracy Morgan and killed another comedian hadn’t slept for more than 24 hours before the accident, authorities said Monday as Morgan recovered in a hospital.

Wal-Mart truck driver Kevin Roper was originally expected to make an initial appearance in state court Monday, but a court official said the Jonesboro, Georgia, resident is scheduled in court on Wednesday. It wasn’t clear Monday if Roper had retained an attorney. He remained free after posting $50,000 bond.

Authorities said the 35-year-old Roper apparently failed to slow for traffic ahead early Saturday in Cranbury Township and swerved at the last minute to avoid a crash. Instead, his big rig smashed into the back of Morgan’s chauffeured Mercedes limo bus, killing comedian James "Jimmy Mack" McNair, authorities said.

The 45-year-old Morgan, a former "Saturday Night Live" and "30 Rock" cast member, remained in critical but stable condition Monday. Morgan’s spokesman, Lewis Kay, said he was "more responsive" after having surgery for a broken leg but faces an "arduous" recovery.

Kay said Morgan suffered a broken femur, a broken nose and several broken ribs and is expected to remain hospitalized for several weeks.

Still scarred by bridge scandal, Christie is at work building coalition for possible 2016 bid

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -- Chris Christie is plunging into what amounts to a cross-country revival tour, looking to recover from a clumsy political scandal and reclaim his place as a promising Republican presidential prospect.

In one recent week, it was on-the-ground politics in Tennessee and New Mexico. This week, after a campaign stop in Pennsylvania, the New Jersey governor returns to the late night comedy circuit with an appearance on NBC’s "Tonight Show." Then he’ll stop by Mitt Romney’s Utah summit, a private event for donors and GOP establishment leaders, and the week after that he heads to Washington to court Christian conservatives at a national gathering of the Faith and Freedom Coalition.

All the while, he’s raising a record-setting amount of money for other Republicans, and bolstering his political network in all the right places -- Iowa and New Hampshire, in particular.

"As the president’s record continues to get worse, as the Democratic Party brand continues to get worse across the country, this momentum’s going to build," Christie said recently. "I’ve been looking forward to this year for quite some time."

Despite his optimism, this isn’t where Christie expected to be at this point on the road to 2016. His stock plummeted early this year after it was discovered that members of his staff and political allies intentionally snarled traffic from New Jersey into Manhattan, apparently to punish a political rival.

Stock split may clear way for Apple to join Dow Jones, plus 4 other things to know about move

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Apple’s resurgent stock may have as much to do with financial engineering as the company’s technological wizardry.

Monday marked Apple’s first stock split in nine years, a move designed to make it more affordable to buy shares of the iPhone and iPad maker.

The maneuver provided a boost even before it was completed. Since the split was announced in late April, Apple’s stock has climbed 25 percent, creating more than $100 billion in shareholder wealth while the Standard & Poor’s 500 edged up just 4 percent.

Other factors contributed to the Apple rally: The company raised its quarterly dividend, committed an additional $30 billion to buying back its stock, struck a $3 billion deal to buy headphone maker Beats Electronics and previewed its latest software for iPhones, iPads and Mac computers.

But the stock split helped renew investor interest in Apple Inc., already the world’s most valuable company.

House panel to investigate prisoner swap

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The House Armed Services Committee will investigate the Obama administration’s exchange of an American prisoner held for five years for five Taliban officials.

Rep. Howard "Buck" McKeon, chairman of the panel, said Monday that lawmakers have serious concerns about the swap sending the five to Qatar and the administration’s failure to notify Congress in violation of the law.

Senior administration officials briefed members of the House about the deal for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. Republicans emerged from the session furious that they had not been informed in advance but were told that 80-90 members of the administration knew of the deal.

The administration used the session to show lawmakers the 90-second "proof of life" video that showed a debilitated Bergdahl. President Barack Obama has defended the exchange.

Clinton: Benghazi probes ‘more of a reason to run’

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Hillary Rodham Clinton said in an interview airing Monday that she feels emboldened to run for president because of Republican criticism of her handling of the deadly 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya.

In an interview with ABC News, Clinton said the Benghazi inquiry from Republicans gives her a greater incentive to run for president because she considers the multiple investigations into the attacks "minor league ball" for a country of the United States’ stature. But she said she’s still undecided.

"It’s more of a reason to run, because I do not believe our great country should be playing minor league ball. We ought to be in the majors," Clinton said. "I view this as really apart from -- even a diversion from -- the hard work that the Congress should be doing about the problems facing our country and the world."

Clinton’s book, "Hard Choices," offers a rebuke to Republicans who have seized upon the Sept. 11, 2012, terrorist attack that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans.

Republicans have accused the Obama administration of stonewalling congressional investigators and misleading the public about the nature of the attack in the weeks before the presidential election. As Clinton weighs her political future, Republicans have questioned her response to the attacks and whether she could have done more to secure the diplomatic compounds.

Multiple independent, bipartisan and Republican-led investigations have faulted the State Department for inadequate security in Benghazi, leading to four demotions. No attacker has been arrested.

Obama and Clinton allies alike have argued that there is no new information following more than a dozen public hearings and the release of 25,000 pages of documents.

In her book, Clinton calls the accusations plainly political.

"I will not be a part of a political slugfest on the backs of dead Americans. It’s just plain wrong, and it’s unworthy of our great country," Clinton writes. "Those who insist on politicizing the tragedy will have to do so without me."