Bernie Sanders' supporters will have Deborah Wasserman Schultz's head on a platter but their candidate won't win the Democratic Party's presidential nomination. For America's sake, they need to accept this.

The release of hacked Democratic National Committee emails revealed what had long been assumed — that DNC chair Schultz and top committee officials had abandoned traditional objectivity to back Hillary Clinton in her battle with Senator Sanders. Ms. Schultz will remain invisible for the rest of the convention and then depart as chair.

That is as it should be, but there is nothing in the emails to indicate that the Clinton partisans swung the election in her favor. Ms. Clinton won the nomination because she collected the most votes and the most delegates.

Senator Sanders' supporters, many of them young and involved in their first campaign, have brought passion and idealism to the election, but in recent weeks they have demonstrated an unappealing sense of entitlement. The proposals of Ms. Clinton won out over those of Mr. Sanders, and as the Vermonter observed in his speech endorsing Ms. Clinton Monday night, "That is what democracy is about." It's painful, as Ms. Clinton's backers discovered eight years ago, but it is necessary to accept that reality and move on for the greater good of the nation.

Comedian Sarah Silverman, a Sanders supporter who endorsed Ms. Clinton on Monday night in Philadelphia, responded to noisy protests by telling the "Bernie or bust" people, "You're being ridiculous." That was another painful truth.


Are Sanders backers going to sit home this fall, which the senator warned them against Monday night, or vote for a Republican nominee whose beliefs are antithetical to everything Senator Sanders stands for? If so, and if Donald Trump becomes president, that should weigh heavily on their consciences for the next four years as the new chief executive takes the nation down a dark path.