BRATTLEBORO — The art and crafts of Brattleboro-West Arts will make their way eastward next week for a downtown exhibit and sale to mark the holiday season.

Titled simply 17 Artists, 3 Days, the show will offer pieces ranging from paintings, photography and botanical drawings to pottery, textiles, woven baskets, jewelry, metalwork and glass. It will run Dec. 4 through 6 in the recently opened public event space at 118 Elliot St.

"The newly renovated space is fresh, open and bright and just the right intimate size to showcase the work of the 17 participating artists," said ceramicist Naomi Lindenfeld. "BWA is proud to be the one of the first groups to show art and craft work in this wonderful new space that was designed to feature visual and performing arts."

Brattleboro-West Arts is a group of about three dozen artists who create their art and make their homes within the watershed of the Whetstone Brook in West Brattleboro, Marlboro and Dummerston. Since 2009, many BWA members have welcomed the public into their studios among the wooded hills to the west of Brattleboro for open studio tours in the spring and fall. The most recent tour Oct. 3 and 4 was part of the nationwide American Craft Week, which named Brattleboro-West Arts the Best Local Artists' Event.

This December show brings BWA to the public under one roof during Brattleboro's bustling holiday retail season. The event coincides with Brattleboro's monthly Gallery Walk as well as Holly Days, Holly Nights, the Brattleboro Area Chamber of Commerce's annual weekend holiday shopping event.


"Instead of having people come to our individual studios, we're bringing the BWA experience to the people," said silversmith Chris Lann. "Brattleboro's art scene is robust and growing, and this show is just one more great reason for art lovers to be downtown that weekend."

Those familiar with the artists of Brattleboro-West Arts will find plenty of fresh work at the show: Jen Wiechers, a new participant in BWA shows, recently added encaustics to her repertoire of acrylic paintings and jewelry. Fiber artist Karen Kamenetzky, a longtime BWA member, will offer smaller, more affordable versions of her textile pieces inspired by cellular imagery. Lann's newest work adds textural elements of woven fine-silver "cloth" to his hand-knit silver chains and nature-inspired castings of recent years. Also, Lindenfeld has been exploring forms and patterns in colored clay that echo her mother's textile work.

In addition to the work of the artists above, the exhibit will feature the paintings of Maisie Crowther, Ron Karpius, Stephen Lloyd and Janet Picard; pottery by Walter Slowinski and Matt Tell; textile art by Jackie Abrams and Kris McDermet; Bobbi Angell's botanical drawings; blown glass by Josh Bernbaum; turned bowls and furniture by woodworker Jason Breen; metal sculpture by Karpius; multimedia collages by Sharon Myers; and the photography of Gene Parulis.

Profiles of the participating artists, as well as other BWA members, are viewable online at

The show will begin at 5 p.m. Dec. 4, with an opening reception from 5:30 to 8. The event will continue from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 5 and 6. For more information, email

"Working in cooperation with fellow artists is a joy," said textile artist Jackie Abrams. "It's that old Aristotle adage: 'The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.' Together, we can create something very exciting!"