Contest ends with a couple of hand-offs

Tavernier Chocolate

Posted
BRATTLEBORO — The third and final Golden Ticket seems to be the gift that keeps on giving.

The original finder donated the prize, a free year of parking, to a shop owner who's now entrusting it to the care of Bratttleboro Museum & Art Center.

"I'm honored and thrilled to pass this on," said Penelope Wurr.

BMAC Director Danny Lichtenfeld said museum visitors can enter their name into a drawing until May 31.

"We're just hoping it will provide a little more incentive for people to come by the museum," he said. "That's kind of been the whole spirit of the promotion in the first place; to get people to come downtown, visit downtown businesses and take in all that downtown has to offer."

Steve Heim was shopping with his girlfriend Rachel Luptak on Sunday when he came across Tavernier Chocolate's limited run of Brattleboro's Golden Ticket bars modeled after the "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" story. The couple bought two at Wurr's retail store on Main Street.

"I grabbed that one and picked it, and lo and behold, it was a winner," Heim said, describing the moment as "random serendipity." "What a thrill. It's pretty great. I can't believe it."

Although Heim hasn't read the Roald Dahl book, he grew up watching the 1971 film adaptation. Heim considers himself a big fan.

"I've seen it so many times," he said, calling the Downtown Brattleboro Alliance campaign to replicate the contest "a great idea."

Heim said he loved actor Gene Wilder's dry sense of humor as chocolatier Willy Wonka in the original film. Tim Burton made a remake of the movie in 2005, with Johnny Depp playing Wonka.

Heim hasn't seen the latter.

"I'm afraid to," he said. "Some things are better left alone."

When Heim reached DBA Promotions Committee Chairwoman Stephanie Bonin about finding the last Golden Ticket, she was watching the original film at Latchis Theatre. Bonin had called him back right after the scene where Charlie Bucket finds his golden ticket.

Heim had seen some of the press and social media about the DBA's campaign. He knows the owners of Tavernier.

"I'm trying to help them find a downtown location, like a storefront for them," he said. "I think they're looking to move."

Heim donated the Golden Ticket to Wurr, a tenant of his.

"I just really like her store," Heim said. "She's a nice person. I know she works there all the time. I thought she could use it more than me. Since I got it in her store, I thought it was a nice thing to do."

Wurr said she thought Heim's donation was "really fantastic" but immediately decided she could not accept it.

"Not only would it be uncomfortable for me to take from my landlord," Wurr said. "Also, I just think it would be inappropriate for me to take it because I'm a vendor of the chocolate bars. It was never my intention to win it."

The museum was selected to be the recipient of the ticket, Wurr said, because it's accessible to everyone.

"As an artist, I wanted to support an institution in our community," she said. "And as a business owner, I kind of recognize that the museum brings visitors to our town from all over the region but it shows a lot of local artists. It's kind of an anchor to the town."

Before deciding on donating to the museum, Wurr said she had been thinking of a "really clever way" to give the ticket to a nonprofit.

"The thing is," she said, "I want the idea of the giving to go on and I want to keep the story going because it's fun. And I just would not be comfortable having it for myself."

Wurr said she refuses to pay for parking, as walking from a free spot further away from the town lots and meters allows her to get some extra exercise each day. Still, she was grateful for the gesture.

"How many people have that nice of a landlord?" Wurr said. "What a sweet offer."

Participating in the contest was "worth it just for the offer," she added. There were 1,000 chocolate bars with three of them holding Golden Tickets. The prize is valued at $400.

Currently, the museum has an exhibit called "GLASSTASTIC." Although not related to the "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" sequel "Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator," children and adults alike are drawn to the exhibit.

Kids in grades K-6, most of them locals, sent in over 1,000 drawings and descriptions of imaginary creatures. Then professional glassblowers selected 20 of them to turn into glass sculptures. On display at the museum, now until the end of the month, are all the drawings and sculptures.

Five other exhibits are also up at the museum. Admission is free for kids 18 and younger, and everyone on Thursdays between 2 and 5 p.m. At other times — the museum is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on all days of the week except Tuesdays — adults pay $8, seniors pay $6 and students pay $4.

Reach staff writer Chris Mays at By Chris Mays

cmays@reformer.com

BRATTLEBORO — The third and final Golden Ticket seems to be the gift that keeps on giving.

The original finder donated the prize, a free year of parking, to a shop owner who's now entrusting it to the care of Bratttleboro Museum & Art Center.

"I'm honored and thrilled to pass this on," said Penelope Wurr.

BMAC Director Danny Lichtenfeld said museum visitors can enter their name into a drawing until May 31.

"We're just hoping it will provide a little more incentive for people to come by the museum," he said. "That's kind of been the whole spirit of the promotion in the first place; to get people to come downtown, visit downtown businesses and take in all that downtown has to offer."

Steve Heim was shopping with his girlfriend Rachel Luptak on Sunday when he came across Tavernier Chocolate's limited run of Brattleboro's Golden Ticket bars modeled after the "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" story. The couple bought two at Wurr's retail store on Main Street.

"I grabbed that one and picked it, and lo and behold, it was a winner," Heim said, describing the moment as "random serendipity." "What a thrill. It's pretty great. I can't believe it."

Although Heim hasn't read the Roald Dahl book, he grew up watching the 1971 film adaptation. Heim considers himself a big fan.

"I've seen it so many times," he said, calling the Downtown Brattleboro Alliance campaign to replicate the contest "a great idea."

Heim said he loved actor Gene Wilder's dry sense of humor as chocolatier Willy Wonka in the original film. Tim Burton made a remake of the movie in 2005, with Johnny Depp playing Wonka.

Heim hasn't seen the latter.

"I'm afraid to," he said. "Some things are better left alone."

When Heim reached DBA Promotions Committee Chairwoman Stephanie Bonin about finding the last Golden Ticket, she was watching the original film at Latchis Theatre. Bonin had called him back right after the scene where Charlie Bucket finds his golden ticket.

Heim had seen some of the press and social media about the DBA's campaign. He knows the owners of Tavernier.

"I'm trying to help them find a downtown location, like a storefront for them," he said. "I think they're looking to move."

Heim donated the Golden Ticket to Wurr, a tenant of his.

"I just really like her store," Heim said. "She's a nice person. I know she works there all the time. I thought she could use it more than me. Since I got it in her store, I thought it was a nice thing to do."

Wurr said she thought Heim's donation was "really fantastic" but immediately decided she could not accept it.

"Not only would it be uncomfortable for me to take from my landlord," Wurr said. "Also, I just think it would be inappropriate for me to take it because I'm a vendor of the chocolate bars. It was never my intention to win it."

The museum was selected to be the recipient of the ticket, Wurr said, because it's accessible to everyone.

"As an artist, I wanted to support an institution in our community," she said. "And as a business owner, I kind of recognize that the museum brings visitors to our town from all over the region but it shows a lot of local artists. It's kind of an anchor to the town."

Before deciding on donating to the museum, Wurr said she had been thinking of a "really clever way" to give the ticket to a nonprofit.

"The thing is," she said, "I want the idea of the giving to go on and I want to keep the story going because it's fun. And I just would not be comfortable having it for myself."

Wurr said she refuses to pay for parking, as walking from a free spot further away from the town lots and meters allows her to get some extra exercise each day. Still, she was grateful for the gesture.

"How many people have that nice of a landlord?" Wurr said. "What a sweet offer."

Participating in the contest was "worth it just for the offer," she added. There were 1,000 chocolate bars with three of them holding Golden Tickets. The prize is valued at $400.

Currently, the museum has an exhibit called "GLASSTASTIC." Although not related to the "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" sequel "Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator," children and adults alike are drawn to the exhibit.

Kids in grades K-6, most of them locals, sent in over 1,000 drawings and descriptions of imaginary creatures. Then professional glassblowers selected 20 of them to turn into glass sculptures. On display at the museum, now until the end of the month, are all the drawings and sculptures.

Five other exhibits are also up at the museum. Admission is free for kids 18 and younger, and everyone on Thursdays between 2 and 5 p.m. At other times — the museum is open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on all days of the week except Tuesdays — adults pay $8, seniors pay $6 and students pay $4.

Reach staff writer Chris Mays at 802-254-2311, ext. 273, or @CMaysBR.

TALK TO US

If you'd like to leave a comment (or a tip or a question) about this story with the editors, please email us. We also welcome letters to the editor for publication; you can do that by filling out our letters form and submitting it to the newsroom.



Powered by Creative Circle Media Solutions