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People walk across Canal Street in Brattleboro recently.

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BRATTLEBORO — A bike/walk action plan developed since June with community input is filled with recommendations intended to make safer roadways and almost completed.

“The final report will include a detailed implementation plan for all the short-term and the long-term bicycle and pedestrian recommendations,” Holly Parker, project manager with SLR Consulting, said Monday at a meeting about the project. “And the plan will include a list of target projects ... that will allow everyone to understand both the scope and the scale that is needed for the plan to be put to pavement.”

The effort kicked off in June when Parker, Brandy Saxton, a planner with PlaceSense, and Brattleboro Planning Director Sue Fillion borrowed e-bikes from the Brooks Memorial Library to tour about 6 miles of Brattleboro. In July and August, they created a website and interactive mapping tool that allowed visitors to point out areas of concern and brought in more than 250 comments.

Fillion said Monday’s meeting was the second in which public feedback was sought and would inform the report heading to the Select Board in about a month or so.

Upcoming projects include bike, pedestrian and vehicular improvements on Putney Road from the West River to the existing roundabout at the Exit 3 ramp in 2025; bike lanes on Route 30 from West River Park to Park Place; and additional bike lanes on Western Avenue next year. Three roundabouts are anticipated to be installed on Putney Road to help calm traffic.

Recommendations in the action plan will “reflect our desire to make improvements that are inexpensive and incremental,” Parker said.

Short-term projects suggested include installing shared lane markings on Frost Street, Church Street, Elliot Street and Elm Street to connect with other shared lane markings in town; putting shared lane markings on Main Street between High Street and Canal Street with “bike boxes” or designated areas that allow bicyclists to get ahead of vehicular traffic; converting on-street parking and wide shoulders into bike lanes on Canal Street to Fairground Road, and installing signing and striping to reduce confusion in that neighborhood.

Long-term projects recommended include continuous bicycle and pedestrian facilities along Putney Road, Canal Street, Maple Street and Fairground Road, and various intersection improvements.

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Addressing concerns about lack of infrastructure by the Great River Terrace housing units on Putney Road, Parker said the Vermont Agency of Transportation will be “making some far-reaching changes in the next few years” in that section of town.

Rep. Mollie Burke, D/Windham-8, a member of the Vermont House Transportation Committee, said VTrans is still working on right-of-way issues.

“That takes a long time,” she said, suggesting pressure could potentially be put on the agency to make the area safer.

Emily Foster of SLR Consulting said Brattleboro already has a “robust pedestrian network” but the key to making safety improvements is filling the gaps. Some upcoming sidewalk improvements will address Western Avenue, Green Street and Clark Street; Putney Road from Chesterfield Road to the West River; and from the new bridge being constructed from Hinsdale, N.H., to Brattleboro on Vernon Street to Morningside Commons.

The report will recommend making visibility enhancements at crosswalks along Western Avenue. That might include decorative or textured crosswalks, curb extensions, pedestrian islands or rectangular rapid flashing beacons.

Another suggestion is to install missing pieces of sidewalk on Fairground Road at Atwood Street near Brattleboro Union High School, Belmont Avenue and Cedar Street. Installing a sidewalk on Black Mountain Road from Putney Road to Buttonwood Hill Road also will be recommended.

“A lot of the suggestions in here are going to take Select Board support,” Fillion said. “So I think people who live in town or even work in town can help advocate that way.”