Online talk with author to explore 'Disobedient Women'

Dionne Searcey

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BRATTLEBORO — With its physical location shuttered for the time being, the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center has expanded its online offerings, including virtual gallery tours, videos, interviews, and art activities to do at home.

BMAC moves further into the production of virtual events on Thursday, April 23, at 7:30 p.m. with a livestreamed talk by Dionne Searcey. A politics reporter at The New York Times, Searcey is the author of the new book "In Pursuit of Disobedient Women: A Memoir of Love, Rebellion, and Family, Far Away."

In her live online talk, Searcey will discuss her work as former West Africa bureau chief for The New York Times and share stories from the lives of women she encountered living at the crossroads of patriarchy and an increasingly globalized world. She will talk about women who resisted conscription as suicide bombers, women who shocked village elders by going to work, and women who are shaking up social norms by getting out of bad marriages.

Searcey joined The New York Times in 2014. As West Africa bureau chief, she covered social, political, and economic issues, with a focus on Nigeria's war against Boko Haram. Previously, she spent nine years at The Wall Street Journal, where she was an investigative reporter. She has also worked at Newsday, The Seattle Times, The Chicago Tribune, and the City News Bureau of Chicago.

The free talk will be held on Zoom and will be open to the first 100 participants to join the meeting, with a recording of the talk available soon afterward on the BMAC website. The talk will also be livestreamed simultaneously on BMAC's Facebook page. BMAC Director Danny Lichtenfeld will moderate the event, and attendees will have the opportunity to submit questions for Searcey. To find out how to participate, visit brattleboromuseum.org.

Searcey's April 23 talk is presented in conjunction with the BMAC exhibit "Grit and Grace, Women at Work," featuring images of working women around the world by National Geographic documentary photographer Alison Wright. A complete album of images from the exhibit, including captions that provide glimpses into each woman's story, can be found on the new BMAC Online page at brattleboromuseum.org.


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