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Three white men who chased and killed Ahmaud Arbery in a Georgia neighborhood are returning to court to be sentenced for their federal hate crime convictions. A U.S. District Court judge in the port city of Brunswick scheduled back-to-back hearings for each defendant Monday. Father and son Greg and Travis McMichael and their neighbor, William “Roddie” Bryan, face possible life sentences after a jury convicted them in February, concluding they targeted Arbery as he ran through their neighborhood in 2020 because he was Black. The trio's punishments in federal court will be largely symbolic, as the McMichaels and Bryan have already received life sentences in a Georgia state court for Arbery's murder.

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Democratic hopefuls in Wisconsin see abortion as the issue that will carry them to election wins in November, but efforts to reach Black voters on the topic are sparse. Several organizing groups said it's a complicated issue in the Black community, with a legacy of views long handed down from the more prominent and conservative denominations in the Black church. Polling data shows that abortion is a slightly more potent issue for white voters in the Democratic coalition than for Black voters. Most of the groups organizing in the Milwaukee area, a critical area for Democrats to win statewide races, are steering away from messaging solely on the issue.

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The federal government has filed civil rights charges against four Louisville police officers over the drug raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor. She was a Black woman whose fatal shooting in Kentucky helped fuel the racial justice protests that rocked the nation in 2020. Most of the charges stem from the faulty drug warrant used to search her home. The charges include unlawful conspiracy, use of force and obstruction of justice. Only one officer charged Thursday was on the scene the night of the killing. Taylor’s mother said she has waited years for police to be held accountable.

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FILE - A file photo, date not known, provided by the Louisville Metro police department shows officer Brett Hankison. The federal government filed civil rights charges Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022 against four Louisville police officers over the drug raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman whose fatal shooting helped fuel the racial justice protests that rocked the nation in 2020. (Louisville Police Department via AP, File)

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FILE - In this file photo, date not known, released by the Louisville (Ky.) police is Louisville Police Det. Joshua Jaynes, an officer fired Jan. 6, 2021. The federal government filed civil rights charges Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022 against four Louisville police officers over the drug raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman whose fatal shooting helped fuel the racial justice protests that rocked the nation in 2020. (Louisville Police via AP)

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Sgt. Kyle Meany of the Louisville Metro Police Department testifies, Feb. 23, 2022, in Louisville, Ky. The federal government filed civil rights charges Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022 against four Louisville police officers over the drug raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman whose fatal shooting helped fuel the racial justice protests that rocked the nation in 2020. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, Pool)

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A judge has made it likely she'll rule in weeks rather than months whether NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell gets to decide the merits of racial discrimination claims made by Black coaches against the league and its teams. Federal Judge Valerie Caproni said Thursday that lawyers for coaches Brian Flores, Steve Wilks and Ray Horton cannot gather additional evidence from defendants to support their arguments that the lawsuit in Manhattan federal court should remain in court rather than be sent to arbitration. The NFL and six of its teams say the lawsuit they maintain is “without merit” is required to go to arbitration, where Goodell would be the arbitrator.

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Attorney General Merrick Garland with Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke for the Civil Rights Division, speaks during a news conference at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022. The U.S. Justice Department announced civil rights charges Thursday against four Louisville police officers over the drug raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman whose fatal shooting contributed to the racial justice protests that rocked the U.S. in the spring and summer of 2020. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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Attorney General Merrick Garland leaves after speaking at a news conference at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022. The U.S. Justice Department announced civil rights charges Thursday against four Louisville police officers over the drug raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman whose fatal shooting contributed to the racial justice protests that rocked the U.S. in the spring and summer of 2020. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

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Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks during a news conference at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 4, 2022. The U.S. Justice Department announced civil rights charges Thursday against four Louisville police officers over the drug raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black woman whose fatal shooting contributed to the racial justice protests that rocked the U.S. in the spring and summer of 2020. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)