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FILE - The meteorite labeled ALH84001 is held in the hand of a scientist at a Johnson Space Center lab in Houston, Aug. 7, 1996. Scientists say they've confirmed the meteorite from Mars contains no evidence of ancient Martian life. The rock caused a splash 25 years ago when a NASA-led team announced that its organic compounds may have been left by living creatures, however primitive. Researchers chipped away at that theory over the decades. A team of scientists led by Andrew Steele of the Carnegie Institution published their findings Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

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The meteorite labeled ALH84001 sits in a chamber at a Johnson Space Center lab in Houston, Aug. 7, 1996. Scientists say they've confirmed the meteorite from Mars contains no evidence of ancient Martian life. The rock caused a splash 25 years ago when a NASA-led team announced that its organic compounds may have been left by living creatures, however primitive. Researchers chipped away at that theory over the decades. A team of scientists led by Andrew Steele of the Carnegie Institution published their findings Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

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This Feb. 10, 2021 image taken by the United Arab Emirates' "Amal," or "Hope," probe released Sunday, Feb. 14, 2021, shows Mars. Scientists say they've confirmed the meteorite from Mars contains no evidence of ancient Martian life. The rock caused a splash 25 years ago when a NASA-led team announced that its organic compounds may have been left by living creatures, however primitive. Researchers chipped away at that theory over the decades. A team of scientists led by Andrew Steele of the Carnegie Institution published their findings Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022. (Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center/UAE Space Agency, via AP)

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FILE- Mars rock Allan Hills 84001, discovered in 1984, is shown at a NASA news conference, Aug. 7, 1996, in Washington. Scientists say they've confirmed the meteorite from Mars contains no evidence of ancient Martian life. The rock caused a splash 25 years ago when a NASA-led team announced that its organic compounds may have been left by living creatures, however primitive. Researchers chipped away at that theory over the decades. A team of scientists led by Andrew Steele of the Carnegie Institution published their findings Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, file)

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In this image released by NASA, Arianespace's Ariane 5 rocket with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope onboard, lifts off Saturday, Dec. 25, 2021, at Europe's Spaceport, the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana. The $10 billion infrared observatory is intended as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. (NASA via AP)

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In this image released by NASA, Arianespace's Ariane 5 rocket with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope onboard, lifts off Saturday, Dec. 25, 2021, at Europe's Spaceport, the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana. The $10 billion infrared observatory is intended as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. (NASA via AP)

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In this photo provided by NASA, Arianespace's Ariane 5 rocket with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope onboard, is seen at the launch pad, Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021, at Europe's Spaceport, the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana. The James Webb Space Telescope has infrared vision, allowing it to peer deeper into the universe, all the way to the first stars and galaxies. Liftoff is set for Saturday morning, Dec. 24, on a French rocket from South America. (Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)

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In this photo provided by NASA, Arianespace's Ariane 5 rocket with NASA's James Webb Space Telescope onboard, is seen at the launch pad, Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021, at Europe's Spaceport, the Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana. The James Webb Space Telescope has infrared vision, allowing it to peer deeper into the universe, all the way to the first stars and galaxies. Liftoff is set for Saturday morning, Dec. 24, on a French rocket from South America. (Chris Gunn/NASA via AP)