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Beach-goers walk by a sign that warns of the absence of lifeguards at Sand Beach in Acadia National Park, Saturday, June 11, 2002, near Bar Harbor, Maine. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

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Beach-goers enjoy Sand Beach in Acadia National Park, Saturday, June 11, 2002, near Bar Harbor, Maine. The park will not have lifeguards on duty this summer due to worker and housing shortages. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

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As another hurricane season gets started, many Native American residents in southeast Louisiana are still struggling to recover from last year's Hurricane Ida. Native Americans have lived in the bayous of southeast Louisiana for hundreds of years and have strong connections to the land and waterways. But coastal erosion has eaten away at their land and made them more vulnerable to storms. Tribal official Cherie Matherne of the Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe lost her home to Ida as did most of her neighbors and fellow tribal members. She says it will take years before people can get back to their lives.

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The circle of life was on vivid display Wednesday at the Jersey Shore in a way that even the youngest children could understand. Seventeen young turtles that had been raised from eggs retrieved from the smashed bodies of their mothers on roads were released back into the wild by a class of kindergartners in Stone Harbor. It was part of a program that has saved thousands of turtles and returned them to the wild over the past 25 years. The turtles were raised from the eggs of their dead mothers or themselves rescued from roads, storm drains or other dangerous places over the years.

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Parts of Florida were facing heavy rain and wind as a storm system that battered Mexico moves across the state. The National Hurricane Center in Miami says the storm once known as Agatha in the Pacific Ocean will be known as Alex in the Atlantic Ocean basin if it reaches tropical storm status. Several Miami streets were flooded and authorities were towing abandoned vehicles. The storm is expected to reach tropical storm strength off Florida’s eastern coast by Saturday night and is expected to strengthen through Monday as it moves away from Florida and into the Atlantic Ocean. In Cuba, authorities say the storm killed three people.

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Much of the Florida peninsula, along with parts of Cuba and the Bahamas, are under a tropical storm warning as a system that battered Mexico moves through the Gulf of Mexico, bringing threats of heavy rain and wind for the weekend. The National Hurricane Center in Miami said early Friday data from a hurricane hunter plane indicate the system's maximum sustained winds increased overnight and was expected to strengthen later Friday. The storm, once known as Agatha in the Pacific Ocean, will be known as Alex in the Atlantic Ocean basin. At 11 a.m., the system was located about 430 miles southwest of Fort Myers with winds nearing 40 mph.

AP
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Hurricane Agatha has made history as the strongest hurricane ever recorded to come ashore in May during the eastern Pacific hurricane season. It made landfall Monday afternoon on a sparsely populated stretch of small beach towns and fishing villages in southern Mexico's Oaxaca state. It was a strong Category 2 hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 105 mph, but it quickly lost power moving inland over the mountainous interior. Agatha was downgraded to a tropical depression Tuesday morning with sustained winds down to 35 mph. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the storm should dissipate by evening, though it still poses a threat of flooding.

AP
  • Updated

Hurricane Agatha has become the strongest hurricane on record to make landfall in May in the eastern Pacific as it swept ashore on a sparsely populated stretch of tourist beaches and fishing towns in southern Mexico. It quickly weakened moving over inland mountains and was downgraded to a tropical storm by late Monday. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the storm should dissipate overnight, but warns that its heavy rains are still a threat to cause dangerous flash floods. Agatha made landfall as a strong Category 2 hurricane Monday afternoon about 5 miles west of Puerto Angel in Mexico's southern state of Oaxaca. That region includes the laid-back tourist resorts of Huatulco, Mazunte and Zipolite.