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AP
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Adnan Mohammed teaches Latin dance for an hour a week in a Damascus studio, helping his students forget the troubles of war — if even briefly. For young Syrian men and women who come to his class, dancing is a form of release, finding their rhythm in music away from their country’s many social and economic pressures. Syria's 11-year war is temporarily pushed out of their minds, as are the politics, the anxiety over the economic crisis and the country’s constantly depreciating currency. For one of his students, Amar Masoud, the dance classes are a “breath of life.”

AP
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Couples dance at a dance club in Damascus, Syria, June 13, 2022. For the participants, ballroom dancing is a form of release, finding their rhythm in music away from their country’s many social and economic pressures. They push Syria's 11-year war from their minds, the politics, the anxiety over the economic crisis and the country's constantly depreciating currency. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)

AP
  • Updated

A couple dance at a club in Damascus, Syria, June 13, 2022. For the participants, ballroom dancing is a form of release, finding their rhythm in music away from their country’s many social and economic pressures. They push Syria's 11-year war from their minds, the politics, the anxiety over the economic crisis and the country's constantly depreciating currency. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)

AP
  • Updated

Instructor Adnan Mohammed, right, teaches a class in the basics of Latin dancing, helping his students forget the troubles of war — if even briefly -- in Damascus, Syria, June 11, 2022. The war, which erupted in 2011, has killed over half a million people and displaced half the country’s pre-war population of 23 million. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)

AP
  • Updated

A couple dances as they train with instructor at a dance studio in Damascus, Syria, June 11, 2022. For an hour a week Syrians learn the basics of Latin dancing, helping to forget the troubles of war — if even briefly. The war, which erupted in 2011, has killed over half a million people and displaced half the country’s pre-war population of 23 million. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)

AP
  • Updated

Couples dance at a dance club in Damascus, Syria, June 13, 2022. For the participants, dancing is a form of release, finding their rhythm in music away from their country’s many social and economic pressures. They push Syria's 11-year war from their minds, the politics, the anxiety over the economic crisis and the country's constantly depreciating currency. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)

AP
  • Updated

Couples dance at a club in Damascus, Syria, June 13, 2022. For the participants, ballroom dancing is a form of release, finding their rhythm in music away from their country’s many social and economic pressures. They push Syria's 11-year war from their minds, the politics, the anxiety over the economic crisis and the country's constantly depreciating currency. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)

AP
  • Updated

Couples dance at a club in Damascus, Syria, June 13, 2022. For the participants, ballroom dancing is a form of release, finding their rhythm in music away from their country’s many social and economic pressures. They push Syria's 11-year war from their minds, the politics, the anxiety over the economic crisis and the country's constantly depreciating currency. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)

AP
  • Updated

Couples dance at a club in Damascus, Syria, June 13, 2022. For the participants, ballroom dancing is a form of release, finding their rhythm in music away from their country’s many social and economic pressures. They push Syria's 11-year war from their minds, the politics, the anxiety over the economic crisis and the country's constantly depreciating currency. (AP Photo/Omar Sanadik)