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Cauline Yates, descendant of one of Thomas Jefferson's slave mistresses, describes the features of the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., Thursday, May 6, 2021. In Virginia, a new law mandates the state’s five public colleges provide “tangible benefits” for slave descendants. Yates said she hopes the law compels the flagship University of Virginia, which Jefferson founded, to provide academic scholarships and economic development projects for descendants. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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Cauline Yates, descendant of one of Thomas Jefferson's slave mistresses, points out names inscribed in the walls of the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., Thursday, May 6, 2021. “It’s time for them to stand up and honor our ancestors,” said the Charlottesville resident, who recently co-founded a group advocating for UVA's slave descendants. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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Cauline Yates, descendant of one of Thomas Jefferson's slave mistresses, talks about the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., Thursday, May 6, 2021. In Virginia, a new law mandates the state’s five public colleges provide “tangible benefits” for slave descendants. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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Shepard Thomas, a recent Georgetown University graduate and a descendant of slaves sold by Jesuits to keep the school open, poses for a portrait on the campus in Washington on Thursday, May 6, 2021. One of the main concerns is how funds committed to reparations work will be spent, and whether slave descendants will have adequate say in the process, according to Thomas. “The fear is that the university will use these funds for their own purposes,” the 23-year-old New Orleans native said. “The university is trying to control the narrative, and we’re trying to prevent that.” (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Shepard Thomas, a recent Georgetown University graduate and a descendant of slaves sold by Jesuits to keep the school open, poses for a portrait on the campus in Washington on Thursday, May 6, 2021. One of the main concerns is how funds committed to reparations work will be spent, and whether slave descendants will have adequate say in the process, according to Thomas. “The fear is that the university will use these funds for their own purposes,” the 23-year-old New Orleans native said. “The university is trying to control the narrative, and we’re trying to prevent that.” (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)