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AP
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Advocates for women and the LGBTQ community in Italy are worrying that the decisive victory by Giorgia Meloni and her far-right party in Italy's national election will bring setbacks for civil rights. Sunday's vote for Parliament saw the defeat of historic champions of battles decades ago to legalize divorce and abortion, as well as ongoing struggles to make same-sex marriage possible. Women have organized rallies for a dozen Italian cities on Wednesday evening to voice fears that a premiership of Meloni, who exalts motherhood and pushes a “God, homeland and traditional family” political agenda, could endanger hard-won abortion rights.

AP
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Far-right party Brothers of Italy's leader Giorgia Meloni votes at a polling station in Rome, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022. Italians are voting in a national election that might yield the nation's first government led by the far right since the end of World War II. (Mauro Scrobogna/LaPresse via AP)

AP
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Journalists look at first result projections in a hotel where far-right party Brothers of Italy is waiting for the vote outcome in Rome, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022. Italians are voting in a national election that might yield the nation's first government led by the far right since the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

AP
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Far-right Brothers of Italy's leader Giorgia Meloni, right, arrives to vote at a polling station in Rome, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022. Italians are voting in a national election that might yield the nation's first government led by the far right since the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

AP
  • Updated

Far-right Brothers of Italy's leader Giorgia Meloni votes at a polling station in Rome, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022. Italians are voting in a national election that might yield the nation's first government led by the far right since the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

AP
  • Updated

Far-right Brothers of Italy's leader Giorgia Meloni votes at a polling station in Rome, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022. Italians are voting in a national election that might yield the nation's first government led by the far right since the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

AP
  • Updated

Eva, a one-and-a-half-year-old Lagotto waits for her owner at a polling station in Rome, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022. Italians were voting on Sunday in an election that could move the country's politics sharply toward the right during a critical time for Europe, with war in Ukraine fueling skyrocketing energy bills and testing the West's resolve to stand united against Russian aggression. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

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Only glimpses of videos that make it online show the protests convulsing Iran over the death of a 22-year-old woman who had been detained by the nation’s morality police. But those flashes show that public anger across the country, once only simmering, is now boiling. The demonstrations surrounding the death of Mahsa Amini — and the government crackdown emerging to stifle them — represent the latest cycle of unrest to grip Iran since its 1979 Islamic Revolution. It likely won’t be the last as the Islamic Republic lurches between crises at home and abroad.

AP
  • Updated

Voters line up at a polling station in Rome, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2022. Italians were voting on Sunday in an election that could move the country's politics sharply toward the right during a critical time for Europe, with war in Ukraine fueling skyrocketing energy bills and testing the West's resolve to stand united against Russian aggression. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)