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The conservation charity founded by Prince William, second in line to the British throne and a well-known environmentalist, keeps its investments in a bank that is one of the world’s biggest backers of fossil fuels. The Royal Foundation also has money invested in a fund that backed giant food companies linked to tropical deforestation through their use of palm oil. The Royal Foundation said by email that it had followed Church of England guidelines on ethical investment since 2015, and goes beyond them. It’s not clear what, if any, role Prince William had in investment decisions, as he did not respond to requests for comment. Experts in green finance say such investments are a governance blind spot.

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Ships are creeping down the middle of the Yangtze after China’s driest summer in six decades left one of the mightiest rivers barely half its normal width. The drought has set off a scramble to contain damage to a weak economy in a politically sensitive year. Factories in Sichuan province and the adjacent metropolis of Chongqing in the southwest were ordered to shut down after reservoirs that supply hydropower fell to half their typical levels and demand for air conditioning surged in scorching temperatures. River ferries in Chongqing that usually are packed with sightseers were empty and tied to piers beside mudflats that stretched down to the depleted river’s edge.

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Asian stock markets have followed Wall Street lower after the Federal Reserve said U.S. inflation is too high, suggesting support for more aggressive interest rate hikes. Shanghai, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Sydney declined. Oil prices edged higher. Wall Street’s benchmark S&P 500 index lost 0.7% after notes from the Fed’s July 26-27 board meeting showed members thought inflation still is “unacceptably high” despite signs U.S. economic growth is weakening. It said the board saw “little evidence” inflation pressures are subsiding. Investors worry aggressive rate hikes by the Fed and central banks in Europe and Asia to tame inflation that is running at multi-decade highs might derail global economic growth.

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The rush to build wind farms to combat climate change is colliding with preservation of one of the U.S. West’s most spectacular predators, the golden eagle. Scientists say the species is teetering on the edge of decline and worry that proliferating wind turbines could push them over the brink. Golden eagle wingspans can reach seven feet — ideal for floating on thermal drafts as they search for their prey. But it also puts them in competition for the wind resources energy companies want. U.S. wildlife officials are encouraging companies to enroll in a program that allows them to kill some eagles in exchange for reducing eagle deaths elsewhere.

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Tourists tour a sunflowers farmland with wind turbines in the background on the grassland in Zhangbei county, in north China's Hebei province on Aug. 15, 2022. The world's two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are sparring on Twitter over climate policy, with China asking if the U.S. can deliver on the landmark climate legislation signed into law by President Joe Biden this week. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP
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Villagers take a rest near horses on the grassland with wind turbines in the background in Zhangbei county, in north China's Hebei province on Aug. 15, 2022. The world's two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are sparring on Twitter over climate policy, with China asking if the U.S. can deliver on the landmark climate legislation signed into law by President Joe Biden this week. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP
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Tourists ride horses near Wind turbines on the grassland in Zhangbei county, in north China's Hebei province on Aug. 15, 2022. The world's two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are sparring on Twitter over climate policy, with China asking if the U.S. can deliver on the landmark climate legislation signed into law by President Joe Biden this week. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP
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A wind turbine is under construction near a sunflowers farmland on the grassland in Zhangbei county, in north China's Hebei province on Aug. 15, 2022. The world's two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are sparring on Twitter over climate policy, with China asking if the U.S. can deliver on the landmark climate legislation signed into law by President Joe Biden this week. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP
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Beachgoers walk near wind turbines along the coast of Pingtan in Southern China's Fujian province, on Aug. 6, 2022. The world's two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are sparring on Twitter over climate policy, with China asking if the U.S. can deliver on the landmark climate legislation signed into law by President Joe Biden this week. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)