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China has cut off climate talks with the U.S. — imperiling future global climate negotiations, but not necessarily blunting the impacts of significant climate actions at home in both countries. The move from China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs came Friday in response to U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s trip to Taiwan, along with cancellations in strategic and military talks. The move came less than three months before the next key international climate summit in November. Meanwhile, the U.S. is poised to pass its most ambitious ever clean-energy legislation later this year. Experts say that could influence China's future climate actions more than any negotiations.

AP
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A Chinese J-11 military fighter jet flies above the Taiwan Strait near Pingtan, the closest land of mainland China to the island of Taiwan, in Pingtan in southeastern China's Fujian Province, Friday, Aug. 5, 2022. China says it is canceling or suspending dialogue with the U.S. on issues from climate change to military relations and anti-drug efforts in retaliation for a visit this week to Taiwan by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

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After fleeing one of the most destructive fires in California history, the Holden family wanted to find a place that hadn't been so severely affected by climate change. They searched for a place that wasn't at risk of hurricanes and fires. They found it in Vermont. Families factoring climate change into a move has become more prominent in the past several years, as temperatures soared and disaster tolls rose. Several reports earlier this year highlighted the trend. One found 2021 was the deadliest year for the contiguous United States since 2011, with 688 people dying in 20 disasters.

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Soraya Holden, left, chases a chicken while walking with her family past their family home, Thursday, May 12, 2022, in Proctor, Vt. After fleeing one of the most destructive fires in California, the Holden family wanted to find a place that had not been so severely affected by climate change and chose Vermont. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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James and Ellie Holden pose with one of their goats and a camping trailer brought when they left California, at their home, Thursday, May 12, 2022, in Proctor, Vt. After fleeing one of the most destructive fires in California, the Holden family wanted to find a place that had not been so severely affected by climate change and chose Vermont. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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FILE - Flames climb trees as the Camp Fire tears through Paradise, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)

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Ellie Holden, center, examines a box of "fire treasures", which are the burnt remains of their family's California home, with son Jack, left, and husband James, Thursday, May 12, 2022, in Proctor, Vt. After fleeing one of the most destructive fires in California, the Holden family wanted to find a place that had not been so severely affected by climate change and chose Vermont. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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Ellie Holden prepares to open a box of "fire treasures", which are the burnt remains of their family's California home, Thursday, May 12, 2022, in Proctor, Vt. After fleeing one of the most destructive fires in California, the Holden family wanted to find a place that had not been so severely affected by climate change and chose Vermont. The few things the Holdens recovered are now boxed in the dairy barn — a burnt trombone, plant hanger, piano brackets, a jewelry box, a ladle, wedding silverware. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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Ellie Holden holds burnt wedding silverware, which survived the fire of her family's California home, while looking at a box of "fire treasures", Thursday, May 12, 2022, in Proctor, Vt. After fleeing one of the most destructive fires in California, the Holden family wanted to find a place that had not been so severely affected by climate change and chose Vermont. The few things the Holdens recovered are now boxed in the dairy barn — a burnt trombone, plant hanger, piano brackets, a jewelry box, a ladle, wedding silverware. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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In this January 2019 photo provided by Sue Womack, James Holden sifts through the remains of his family's homestead, which burned to the ground in a 2018 wildfire, in Paradise, Calif. After fleeing one of the most destructive fires in California, the Holden family wanted to find a place that had not been so severely affected by climate change and chose Vermont. (Sue Womack via AP)