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Thanksgiving and the holidays are the busiest times of the year for supermarkets. But all that food from the grocery store came from somewhere. In much of the Northeast, that somewhere is Hunts Point Produce Market in the Bronx, New York, which moves about 2.5 billion pounds of fruit and vegetables destined for grocery stores, restaurants and household refrigerators. The biggest tenant at the market is S. Katzman Produce, which has been around for about a hundred years. In the days heading into Thanksgiving, the market was abuzz with activity as sellers and buyers sealed deals for tomatoes, mangoes and lettuce.

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The journey to the 2024 Olympic Games is well underway for dozens of b-boys and b-girls around the globe who hope to secure a spot to compete when breaking, the now-international dance art, makes its athletic debut on the world's stage. After the Red Bull BC One World Final, held earlier this month in the birthplace of hip hop and a short distance from the very streets where Black and Puerto Rican New Yorkers pioneered the art of breaking, the field of Olympic competitors is starting to take shape.

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If you're cooking or eating a special dinner this week, you have something in common with our ancient human ancestors. A recent study found the oldest evidence of using fire to cook, dating back to 780,000 years ago. The study comes from a site in Israel, where members of an extinct human species probably cooked fish over a fire. Scientists think learning to cook was a big step for  evolution, because it helped early humans fuel their bigger brains. Later on, using food for special ceremonies helped build community when humans settled down. In the first feast 12,000 years ago, Stone Age humans ate tortoises and cattle to mark the death of a shaman.

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A new book from the owner of a New Orleans craft cocktail bar is showing readers an elegant look at cocktails in a city known for drinking excess. Neal Bodenheimer founded Cure in 2009 and since then has gone on to open other bars and restaurants. His new book is titled “Cure: New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix ’Em." It showcases drinks created by Cure staff and well-known New Orleans drink staples such as the Sazerac or the Ramos Gin Fizz. The book includes essays about the city and its drinking culture. Bodenheimer says the book is a “love letter to the city from me.”

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Neal Bodenheimer, owner and founder of Cure, poses in his craft cocktail bar with a copy of his new book "Cure: New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix 'Em" in New Orleans, Friday, Nov. 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

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Neal Bodenheimer, owner and founder of Cure, poses in his craft cocktail bar with a copy of his new book "Cure: New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix 'Em" in New Orleans, Friday, Nov. 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

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Copies of his new book "Cure: New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix 'Em" sit on the shelves of Cure, a craft cocktail bar founded by author Neal Bodenheimer, in New Orleans, Friday, Nov. 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

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Neal Bodenheimer, owner and founder of Cure, poses in his craft cocktail bar in New Orleans, Friday, Nov. 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)