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The NFL’s handling of concussions has evolved dramatically from the days when players were given smelling salts on the bench and sent back into the game. The league and the NFL Players Association have implemented extensive protocols and hired unaffiliated neurotrauma consultants to work with team physicians at each game to diagnose concussions. Still, football is a violent sport and injuries similar to the frightening one Miami Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa suffered Thursday night seem unavoidable. The most effective means of protecting players remains enforcing strict concussion protocols, which players, fans and others are concerned didn’t happen with Tagovailoa.

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Fans will have a chance to say goodbye to Naomi Judd, the late matriarch of the Grammy-winning country duo The Judds, on a tour starting Friday. The Judd family continues to grieve her sudden death on April 30 only weeks after the tour was announced. Wynonna Judd, who will helm the 11-city tour starting Friday, called it "devastatingly beautiful" to relive her memories of her mom during the tour. Daughter Ashley Judd recalled her mother's compassion and desire to learn, as well as her efforts to reduce the stigma of mental health. The family hopes that fans will be uplifted by her legacy of music and advocacy.

AP
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Nearly a dozen candidates are running in Brazil’s presidential election but only two stand a chance of reaching a runoff: former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and incumbent Jair Bolsonaro. Eight of 10 Brazilians say they will vote for one of these two political titans on Sunday, leaving little space for challengers. The election could signal the return of the world’s fourth-largest democracy to a leftist government after four years of far-right politics, a pandemic that killed nearly 700,000 people and a poorly performing economy. Polls show da Silva with a commanding lead that could possibly even give him a first-round victory without any need for a runoff.

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Shares of Biogen and other drugmakers researching Alzheimer’s disease have soared after Japan’s Eisai Co. said its potential treatment appeared to slow the fatal disease in a late-stage study. Eisai announced results late Tuesday from a global study of nearly 1,800 people with early-stage Alzheimer’s. The drugmaker said early results showed that its treatment, lecanemab, reduced patient clinical decline by 27% when compared to a placebo or fake drug after 18 months of the infused treatment. Patients were monitored using a scale that measures how they do in areas like memory, judgement, problem solving and personal care.

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Katie Couric says she was diagnosed with breast cancer on the first day of summer, and since has undergone surgery and radiation treatment. The 65-year-old media personality memorably underwent screening for colon cancer on the "Today" show in 2000, two years after her first husband died of the disease at age 41. Her sister also died of pancreatic cancer at age 54 but her circle's long history with the disease did not include breast cancer. Like she did as a “Today” show host, Couric said she hoped that talking about her experience would encourage women to make an appointment for a mammogram.

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FILE - Katie Couric appears at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party on March 27, 2022, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Couric said Wednesday that she'd been diagnosed with breast cancer, and underwent surgery and radiation treatment this summer to treat the tumor. Couric announced her diagnosis in an essay on her website, saying she hoped it would encourage other women to be tested. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

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FILE — The Biogen Inc., headquarters is shown March 11, 2020, in Cambridge, Mass. Shares of Biogen and other drugmakers researching Alzheimer’s disease soared early Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022, after Japan’s Eisai Co. said its potential treatment appeared to slow the fatal disease’s progress in a late-stage study. Eisai announced results late Tuesday from a global study of nearly 1,800 people with early-stage Alzheimer’s (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

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A student at a military college who sued top Pentagon officials after he was deemed unfit for service because he tested positive for HIV has settled his lawsuit and plans to pursue his dream of becoming an Army officer. Eddie Diaz, a student at Norwich University in Vermont, said Tuesday he just wants an opportunity to serve his country. Diaz said in the lawsuit filed in Vermont in May that after he tested positive he was dropped from the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps and the Vermont Army National Guard despite being healthy and asymptomatic. Messages seeking comment were left with the Pentagon and the Vermont National Guard.

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A group in military fatigues walks in front of Jackman Hall on the campus of Norwich University on July 16, 2018, in Northfield. A student at …

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The mother of a woman with cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities is suing the Philadelphia care home where her daughter lived for 40 years. Cheryl Yewdall died five days after she was found face down with a large paper towel or disinfecting wipe in her windpipe. No one has been charged, but a new wrongful death lawsuit filed on behalf of Yewdall's mother casts suspicion on an unidentified staff member at the Merakey Woodhaven care home. Christine Civatte says she trusted the facility to safeguard her 50-year-old daughter. Merakey calls Yewdall’s death “a serious and tragic incident” but is denying responsibility.