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A United States federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by the Mexican government against U.S. gun manufacturers that argued their commercial practices has led to bloodshed in Mexico. Judge F. Dennis Saylor in Boston ruled Friday that Mexico’s claims did not overcome the broad protection provided gun manufacturers by the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act passed in 2005. The law shields gun manufacturers from damages “resulting from the criminal or unlawful misuse” of a firearm. Mexico’s Foreign Affairs Ministry says it will appeal the decision.

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A federal judge has found that Georgia election practices challenged by a group associated with Democrat Stacey Abrams do not violate the constitutional rights of voters. U.S. District Judge Steve Jones on Friday ruled in favor of the state on all remaining issues in the lawsuit that was filed nearly four years ago. The federal lawsuit alleged serious problems with Georgia’s election system. It was filed in 2018 by Fair Fight Action, an organization founded by Abrams, a voting rights activist and the Democratic nominee for Georgia governor. Jones wrote that while “Georgia's election system is not perfect,” the practices challenged in the lawsuit don't violate the Constitution or the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

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Gun rights groups and firearms owners have launched another attempt to overturn Connecticut’s ban on certain semiautomatic rifles that was enacted in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. A new lawsuit was filed Thursday in federal court, citing a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June that overturned a New York law and expanded gun rights. The high court had earlier upheld assault weapons bans in Connecticut and New York passed in response to the school shooting that killed 20 first graders and six educators in 2012. Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says the state's gun laws save lives and he will defend them against the new lawsuit.

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FILE - Firearms training unit Det. Barbara J. Mattson, of the Connecticut State Police, holds up a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model of gun used by Adam Lanza in the December 2012 Sandy Hook School shooting, during a hearing of a legislative subcommittee in Hartford, Conn., on Jan. 28, 2013. Citing a U.S. Supreme Court decision earlier this year, gun rights groups and firearms owners filed a new lawsuit Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022, in federal court in another attempt to overturn Connecticut's ban on certain semiautomatic rifles that was enacted in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)

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FILE - Connecticut Attorney General William Tong speaks outside the Connecticut Supreme Court during a news conference, Friday, Jan. 10, 2020, in Hartford, Conn. Citing a U.S. Supreme Court decision earlier this year, gun rights groups and firearms owners filed a new lawsuit Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022, in federal court in another attempt to overturn Connecticut's ban on certain semiautomatic rifles that was enacted in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. “Connecticut’s gun laws save lives, and we are not going back,” state Attorney General William Tong said in a statement. (AP Photo/Chris Ehrmann, File)

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Civil rights lawyer John Burris is Northern California's go-to attorney when it comes to police brutality. At age 77, he continues to travel the state to appear with victims big and small to allege violations against law enforcement. Burris helped Rodney King win a $3.8 million jury verdict in 1994 for the brutal beating he received by four LAPD officers. The beating was captured on video and opened mainstream America to what was a common occurrence in Black America. The Oakland attorney marvels at the changes in the public's attitude toward police but says people still need to press for reform.

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When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a high school football coach’s right to pray on the field after games, there were predictions of dramatic consequences from across the ideological spectrum. But three months after the decision, there’s no sign that large numbers of coaches have been newly inspired to follow Joseph Kennedy’s high-profile example. The Court ruled 6-3 for the coach on June 27, with the conservative justices in the majority and the liberals in dissent. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 54% of Americans approve of the decision, while 22% disapprove and 23% hold neither opinion.

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Activists say Iran's current wave of protests are different from previous unrest. Unleashing their anger at the compulsory veil for women, protesters are targeting something central to the identity of Iran's Islamic cleric-led rule. The protests are drawing from a long history of resistance among Iranian women. During the 1979 revolution, the hijab was a sign of breaking with the secular monarchy. But when the new Islamic Republic then made wearing it mandatory, thousands of women marched in protests. Woman have been challenging the rule ever since. The death of a woman arrested for wearing too loose a headscarf has sparked an eruption of anger.

AP
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Advocates for women and the LGBTQ community in Italy are worrying that the decisive victory by Giorgia Meloni and her far-right party in Italy's national election will bring setbacks for civil rights. Sunday's vote for Parliament saw the defeat of historic champions of battles decades ago to legalize divorce and abortion, as well as ongoing struggles to make same-sex marriage possible. Women have organized rallies for a dozen Italian cities on Wednesday evening to voice fears that a premiership of Meloni, who exalts motherhood and pushes a “God, homeland and traditional family” political agenda, could endanger hard-won abortion rights.