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Saturday marks five years since a gunman rained bullets into an outdoor country music festival crowd on the Las Vegas Strip. The grim drumbeat of mass shootings has only continued in the years since, from New York to Colorado to Texas. Northeastern University professor James Alan Fox oversees a database maintained by The Associated Press, USA Today and Northeastern University and says there's also been a horrifying uptick in the number of mass shootings with an especially high number of people killed. The news takes a toll on survivors of the Las Vegas slaying, but a strong sense of community has also developed.

AP
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An animal welfare charity says an undercover investigation has uncovered cruel and allegedly illegal practices in Romania's chinchilla fur farms. Humane Society International has now appealed to Romania's prime minister to “stop this atrocious suffering in the name of fashion” and completely ban fur farming in the Eastern European country. In response to HSI’s investigation, a group of Romanian lawmakers has already filed proposed legislation in parliament for a blanket ban on fur farming. Chinchillas are a highly sociable species of rodent native to South America, and prized for their soft, silky fur.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom has approved one of the most contentious bills before him this year. It's a measure aiding efforts by farmworkers to unionize that was backed by President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. Their support pinned Newsom in a difficult political position after his office previously criticized the proposal. The bill he signed Wednesday will allow farmworkers who provide much of the nation’s fruits and vegetables to vote by mail in union elections. Proponents say that will help protect workers from union busting and other intimidation. Farm owners say it lacks necessary safeguards to prevent fraud.

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Clergy in 33 states are exempt from laws requiring professionals such as teachers, physicians and psychotherapists to report information about alleged child abuse to police or child welfare officials. That loophole has resulted in an unknown number of predators being allowed to continue abusing children for years despite having confessed the behavior to religious officials. An Associated Press review finds that over the past two decades, more than 130 bills have been proposed in state legislatures to create or amend child sex abuse reporting laws. After intense opposition from religious groups, the clergy privilege remained unchanged. Often, legislative efforts to close the loophole run up against lawmakers who are also church members.

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This undated Yewdall family photo provided by attorney James Pepper shows Cheryl Yewdall, a woman with cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities who died in January 2022. Yewdall's mother is suing the Philadelphia care home where she was found face down on the floor with a paper towel or disinfecting wipe in her trachea. (Yewdall Family/Courtesy of Pepper Law via AP)

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This undated Yewdall family photo provided by attorney James Pepper shows Cheryl Yewdall, a woman with cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities who died in January 2022. Yewdall's mother is suing the Philadelphia care home where she was found face down on the floor with a paper towel or disinfecting wipe in her trachea. (Yewdall Family/Courtesy of Pepper Law via AP)

AP
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Cuba is holding a rare referendum on an unusually contentious law — a government-backed code that would allow same-sex couples to marry and adopt. It also outlines the rights of children and grandparents and tries to protect against gender violence. The code of more than 400 articles has been questioned by many members of the island’s increasingly vocal evangelical community. President Miguel Díaz-Canel has promoted the law but acknowledged Sunday that “it still has issues that our society as a whole does not understand,.”

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Arizona Republican gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake is misrepresenting her opponent's legislative record on education in a video being widely shared on social media. In the video, set to dramatic music and featuring patriotic visuals, Lake falsely suggests that Democratic candidate Katie Hobbs wanted to ban the Pledge of Allegiance in schools and to teach kindergartners about sex, misrepresenting Hobbs' voting record and the content of various Arizona education bills. Hobbs did not vote to block documents such as the Pledge of Allegiance from schools, and her support for a bill for K-12 sex education specified that the sex education be age-appropriate.