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A Krakow councilman says the Polish city cancelled gigs by Pink Floyd co-founder Roger Waters because of his sympathetic stance toward Russia in its war against Ukraine. And he invited the singer to join him on a visit to Ukraine to see the extent of Russian crimes. Councilman Lukasz Wantuch said the city owns the arena where two Waters’ concerts had been scheduled for April before being canceled. He said that Waters was free to perform in a private venue if he wishes. Wantuch spearheaded a symbolic resolution to declare Waters “persona non grata” in Krakow. He also invited Waters on Monday to join him on a visit to Ukraine to see for himself the extent of devastation caused by Russian attacks.

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: President Joe Biden did not announce that the U.S. is signing a U.N. “Small Arms Treaty,” that would establish an international gun control registry. There is no scientific evidence to suggest humans or other mammals vaccinated with mRNA shots die within five years. A video shows traffic at the Finnish-Russian border last month, not Russians fleeing after Putin announced the partial mobilization of reservists to Ukraine. Florida ranks 48th in the nation in average public school teacher pay, not 9th.

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A police investigation into allegations that France soccer star Paul Pogba was targeted by extortionists has taken a bizarre new twist with a series of videos released by his elder brother, who is one of the suspects. Mathias Pogba posted more than 30 videos taking aim at the 2018 World Cup winner, his entourage and wealthy lifestyle. He read face-to-camera from a statement many pages long, a seemingly time-consuming endeavor because he changed his T-shirt three times during the recordings. It wasn’t clear when the videos, posted Friday on Twitter, were filmed. But it appeared to have been before Mathias Pogba turned himself in for police questioning last week. He has reportedly been held in custody ever since.

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Arizona Republican gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake is misrepresenting her opponent's legislative record on education in a video being widely shared on social media. In the video, set to dramatic music and featuring patriotic visuals, Lake falsely suggests that Democratic candidate Katie Hobbs wanted to ban the Pledge of Allegiance in schools and to teach kindergartners about sex, misrepresenting Hobbs' voting record and the content of various Arizona education bills. Hobbs did not vote to block documents such as the Pledge of Allegiance from schools, and her support for a bill for K-12 sex education specified that the sex education be age-appropriate.

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Iranians are experiencing a near-total internet blackout amid days of mass protests against the government. They also lost access to Instagram and WhatsApp, two of the last Western social media platforms available in the country. An Iranian official on Wednesday had hinted that such measures might be taken out of security concerns. The loss of connectivity will make it more difficult for people to organize protests and share information about the rolling crackdown on dissent. Iran has seen widespread protests over the death of a 22-year-old woman who was detained for allegedly wearing the mandatory Islamic headscarf too loosely. Demonstrators have called for the downfall of the Islamic Republic, even as Iran's president addressed the U.N. General Assembly.

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After bashing the proceedings on his web show, conspiracy theorist Alex Jones has made his first appearance outside a courthouse in Connecticut where a jury will determine how much damages he should pay for telling his audience the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting was a hoax. Jones showed up and made comments outside, but left a short time later, indicating he wouldn't be testifying Tuesday. Jones has criticized the proceedings from his Infowars studio in Austin, Texas, calling it a “show trial.” He has already been found liable for damages and the trial is to decide how much he must pay eight families and an FBI agent who responded to the massacre.

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As often happens, NBC's ‘Sunday Night Football’ game won the week's rating competition, but the Chicago-Green Bay game had a tough battle with the revamped “Monday Night Football” game. That game, between Denver and Seattle, was seen by nearly 10.3 million on ABC and another 8 million people when it was simulcast on ESPN. CBS' “60 Minutes” was the most popular non-football game on TV, with its season debut featuring an interview with President Joe Biden reaching 10.2 million people. During a week when broadcast networks mostly had one last week of reruns in preparation for starting the fall TV season, NBC's summer hit “America's Got Talent” had its swan song.

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Iran is facing international criticism over the death of a woman held by its morality police, which ignited three days of protests across the country. An Iranian official said Tuesday that three people had been killed by unnamed armed groups in the Kurdish region of the country where the protests began. It was the first official confirmation of deaths linked to the unrest. The U.N. human rights office called for an investigation. The United States, which is trying to revive the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, called on the Islamic Republic to end its “systemic persecution” of women. Italy also condemned her death. Iran dismissed the criticism as politically motivated.

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A local elected official is due in court on a murder charge in the stabbing death of a Las Vegas investigative journalist who wrote articles critical of him and his managerial conduct. Robert Telles, the Clark County public administrator, has been jailed without bail since his arrest Sept. 7 — five days after the killing of veteran Las Vegas Review-Journal staff writer Jeff German. Police allege the 45-year-old Telles planned the attack and waited in a vehicle outside German’s home before stabbing him seven times. Telles had lost his Democratic primary for reelection in June, after German's articles appeared in the Review-Journal. His term in office expires Dec. 31.

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Plans by news organizations that have been in place for years — even decades — to cover the death of Queen Elizabeth II were triggered and tested when the event took place. London has been inundated with journalists, with more headed to the city for the funeral services on Monday. A giant audience is expected for the culmination of all the ceremonies, which one expert called “catnip” for television networks. For many journalists, plans have gone smoothly. There were some issues on Thursday with restrictions placed by the palace on use of video from inside Westminster Hall, where the queen's body was lying in state.