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A United States federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by the Mexican government against U.S. gun manufacturers that argued their commercial practices has led to bloodshed in Mexico. Judge F. Dennis Saylor in Boston ruled Friday that Mexico’s claims did not overcome the broad protection provided gun manufacturers by the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act passed in 2005. The law shields gun manufacturers from damages “resulting from the criminal or unlawful misuse” of a firearm. Mexico’s Foreign Affairs Ministry says it will appeal the decision.

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A federal judge has found that Georgia election practices challenged by a group associated with Democrat Stacey Abrams do not violate the constitutional rights of voters. U.S. District Judge Steve Jones on Friday ruled in favor of the state on all remaining issues in the lawsuit that was filed nearly four years ago. The federal lawsuit alleged serious problems with Georgia’s election system. It was filed in 2018 by Fair Fight Action, an organization founded by Abrams, a voting rights activist and the Democratic nominee for Georgia governor. Jones wrote that while “Georgia's election system is not perfect,” the practices challenged in the lawsuit don't violate the Constitution or the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

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Gun rights groups and firearms owners have launched another attempt to overturn Connecticut’s ban on certain semiautomatic rifles that was enacted in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. A new lawsuit was filed Thursday in federal court, citing a U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June that overturned a New York law and expanded gun rights. The high court had earlier upheld assault weapons bans in Connecticut and New York passed in response to the school shooting that killed 20 first graders and six educators in 2012. Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says the state's gun laws save lives and he will defend them against the new lawsuit.

AP
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From left, Moscow-appointed head of Kherson Region Vladimir Saldo, Moscow-appointed head of Zaporizhzhia region Yevgeny Balitsky, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Denis Pushilin, leader of self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic and Leonid Pasechnik, leader of self-proclaimed Luhansk People's Republic pose for a photo during a ceremony to sign the treaties for four regions of Ukraine to join Russia, at the Kremlin in Moscow, Friday, Sept. 30, 2022. The signing of the treaties making the four regions part of Russia follows the completion of the Kremlin-orchestrated "referendums." (Dmitry Astakhov, Sputnik, Government Pool Photo via AP)

AP
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Nearly a dozen candidates are running in Brazil’s presidential election but only two stand a chance of reaching a runoff: former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and incumbent Jair Bolsonaro. Eight of 10 Brazilians say they will vote for one of these two political titans on Sunday, leaving little space for challengers. The election could signal the return of the world’s fourth-largest democracy to a leftist government after four years of far-right politics, a pandemic that killed nearly 700,000 people and a poorly performing economy. Polls show da Silva with a commanding lead that could possibly even give him a first-round victory without any need for a runoff.

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When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a high school football coach’s right to pray on the field after games, there were predictions of dramatic consequences from across the ideological spectrum. But three months after the decision, there’s no sign that large numbers of coaches have been newly inspired to follow Joseph Kennedy’s high-profile example. The Court ruled 6-3 for the coach on June 27, with the conservative justices in the majority and the liberals in dissent. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 54% of Americans approve of the decision, while 22% disapprove and 23% hold neither opinion.

AP
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Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro has been waging an all-out campaign to shore up the crucial evangelical vote ahead of Oct. 2 elections. Evangelicals helped carry him to power in 2018, and he proceeded to tap members of their churches for important ministries and for a Supreme Court nomination. But in this electoral cycle, Bolsonaro initially found more difficulty winning their favor. The campaign involves the first lady and keyboard crusaders. Influential pastors and politicians are warning their followers, on Facebook and in pulpits, that the race’s front-runner, leftist former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, would close Christian churches. The campaign also involves associating da Silva with Afro Brazilian religions.

AP
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A Spanish judge has approved a trial for Colombian pop singer Shakira on charges of tax fraud. Spanish prosecutors accused the entertainer in 2018 of failing to pay 14.5 million euros ($13.9 million) in taxes on income earned between 2012 and 2014. They are seeking an eight-year prison sentence and a hefty fine if she is found guilty of tax evasion. The 45-year-old Shakira has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing and rejected a deal with authorities to avoid going to trial. The date for the trial has yet to be set.

AP
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Italy’s former premier Silvio Berlusconi is making his return to Italy’s parliament nearly a decade after being banned from holding public office over a tax fraud conviction. Berlusconi was re-elected to the Senate in Sunday's elections that indicated a far-right-led alliance would take power. In 2013, the Senate expelled Berlusconi because of a tax fraud conviction stemming from his media business and he was banned from holding public office for six years. After serving a sentence of community service, a court ruled he could once again hold public office and he won a seat in the European Parliament in 2019.