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The former Yale University women’s soccer coach whose cooperation with authorities helped blow the lid off the nationwide college admissions bribery scandal by leading the FBI to the scheme’s mastermind has been sentenced to five months in prison. Rudy Meredith also was sentenced Wednesday to a year of probation and ordered to forefit more than $550,000. He pleaded guilty in March 2019 to wire fraud for taking hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes to help students get into the elite Ivy League university as soccer recruits. Federal prosecutors had recommended no additional prison time beyond the one day he had already spent in custody.

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Kentucky voters have rejected a proposed constitutional amendment that would have removed any protection for abortion rights from the constitution of their deeply red state. The defeat of the proposed constitutional amendment in the midterm elections that concluded Tuesday revealed an apparent gap between voter sentiment and the expectations of lawmakers in Kentucky, where the legislature is heavily Republican and has moved to ban most abortions. Lawmakers added the proposed amendment to the ballot in 2021, a move some thought would drive more conservative voters to the polls before Roe v. Wade was overturned.

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Democratic Attorney General Maura Healey has been elected governor of Massachusetts, making history as the nation’s first openly lesbian governor and the state’s first woman and openly gay candidate elected to the office. Healey defeated Republican candidate Geoff Diehl, a former state representative who had the endorsement of former President Donald Trump. The victory returns the Massachusetts governor’s office to Democratic hands. The seat has been held for eight years by Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, who didn’t seek reelection. During the campaign, Healey said she would protect “access to safe and legal abortion in Massachusetts” in the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision overturning Roe v. Wade.

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A federal judge has approved an order that requires Brown University to pay more than $1 million to cover attorneys’ fees and other expenses related to a legal case brought by several student-athletes who challenged the school’s plan to drop several women’s varsity sports. The women said the plan to reduce the varsity sports to club status in 2020 violated a consent decree that dated to 1998 and stemmed from a landmark Title IX case. In the settlement of the 2020 dispute, Brown agreed to reinstate its women’s varsity equestrian and fencing teams. A voicemail seeking comment was left with a Brown spokesperson.

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The city of Boston has agreed to pay more than $2.1 million to the Christian legal organization that backed a court challenge after the city refused to fly a Christian flag outside City Hall, a case that made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The settlement announced Tuesday by Liberty Counsel covers attorneys’ fees and other costs associated with the legal battle that started in 2017 when a city resident was refused a request to hoist the flag on one of three poles on City Hall Plaza. The Supreme Court ruled in the resident's favor in May and the flag flew in August.