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AP
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A state-linked newspaper in the United Arab Emirates published a story this summer about a hot-button issue in the country: How Emiratis are coping with high fuel prices. Editors, accustomed to the UAE's strict press laws, thought it safe. Instead, it unleashed a firestorm. Within days, top editors were interrogated. Within weeks, dozens of employees were fired and the print paper declared dissolved. The purge at Al Roeya reflects the intense challenges facing local journalists in the autocratic UAE, even as it courts Western media companies. The newspaper’s publisher, International Media Investments, insisted Al Roeya’s closure stems only from its transformation into a new Arabic language business outlet with CNN.

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Stocks closed broadly higher on Wall Street, breaking a three-week losing streak. The benchmark S&P 500 index rose 1.5% on Friday, but is still well below where it was in mid-August. Big gains for technology companies pushed the Nasdaq composite even higher. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also climbed, as did small-company stocks. All 11 industry sectors of the S&P 500 rose, including energy stocks, which caught a break from recent declines thanks to an upturn in oil prices. DocuSign rose sharply after the electronic signature company reported strong second-quarter sales and raised its subscription forecast.

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Asian benchmarks are mostly higher, as investor optimism got a perk from a rally on Wall Street that’s on track to break a three-week losing streak. Benchmarks rose in Tokyo, Seoul, Sydney and Shanghai. Somewhat reassuring to market watchers was Japan’s revised seasonally adjusted real gross domestic product, or GDP, for the second quarter, which was revised upward to an annual rate of 3.5% growth, better than the initial estimate at 2.2%. Data showed private consumption and business spending are holding up in the world’s third-largest economy. The S&P 500 rose 1.8%, and the tech-heavy Nasdaq rose even more.

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Asian shares are mostly lower, as pessimism prevailed about higher interest rates ahead and Wall Street shares fell for the fourth straight week. Oil prices fell, while the Japanese yen continued to decline against the U.S. dollar. Rising energy prices are adding to the worries about recessions in some parts of the world. Shares fell on Wall Street coming into a holiday-shortened week. Stocks have been losing ground as the Federal Reserve has indicated it will not let up anytime soon on raising interest rates to bring down the highest inflation in decades. Wall Street also is grappling with worries about an energy crisis in Europe and its implications for the global economy.

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Asian stock markets are mixed after China promised to speed up policy changes to boost anemic economic growth and Australia's central bank raised its benchmark interest rate. Shanghai, Tokyo and Seoul gained while Hong Kong declined. U.S. markets were closed for a holiday. The Chinese Cabinet’s planning agency promised to accelerate easier lending and other policies but announced no new spending. Australia's central bank raised its main interest rate to its highest level since 2015 and said more rate hikes are planned. European markets sank following the announcement that a suspension of Russian gas supplies through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline would be extended indefinitely.

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OPEC and allied oil-producing countries, including Russia, have made a small trim in their supplies to the global economy. The move Monday underlines their unhappiness as recession fears help drive down crude prices — and the cost of gasoline, to the delight of drivers. The decision for October rolls back a mostly symbolic increase of 100,000 barrels per day in September. Growing worries about slumping future demand have helped send oil prices down from June peaks of over $120 per barrel. That has cut into the windfall for OPEC+ countries’ coffers but proved a blessing for U.S. drivers as pump prices have eased.

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Global stock markets are lower after Europe faced a new squeeze on gas supplies. London and Frankfurt opened lower Monday. Tokyo, Hong Kong and South Korea also fell while Shanghai gained. Oil prices rose more than $2 per barrel while the euro edged lower. European markets were roiled by Russian energy giant Gazprom's announcement that a suspension of gas supplies through the Nord Stream 1 pipeline would be extended indefinitely. That adds to shortages in Germany and other economies. Traders also worry U.S. government data that showed wages rose sharply in August might be seen by the Federal Reserve might see that as evidence more interest rate hikes are needed to bring down inflation.

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FILE - The sun sets behind an idle pump jack near Karnes City, USA, April 8, 2020. Oil prices are sagging amid fears of recessions across the globe. OPEC and allied countries are weighing what to do about that when they meet online Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022. High oil prices were a bonanza for countries like Saudi Arabia over the summer, but now they're well off those highs. Saudi Arabia's oil minister has even said the group known as OPEC+ could cut production at any time. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

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Stocks gave up an early rally and ended lower on Wall Street, marking their third losing week in a row. Indexes had opened higher following a report on the job market that showed a moderate slowdown in hiring. That stoked cautious optimism that the Federal Reserve may not need to be as aggressive with high interest rates in its fight against inflation. Indexes turned lower in the afternoon after Russian energy giant Gazprom said it wouldn’t reopen a natural gas pipeline to Germany for now, a bad sign for Europe's ongoing struggle with higher energy prices. The S&P 500 fell about 1%.

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Asian stock markets are mixed ahead of U.S. jobs data as investors that might influence Federal Reserve plans for more interest rate hikes to cool surging inflation. Shanghai and Seoul advanced while Tokyo and Hong Kong retreated. Oil prices rose more than $1. Investors waited for U.S. data on August hiring to see how the economy is responding to four earlier hikes to cool inflation that is at a four-decade high. A strong reading would give ammunition to Fed officials who say higher interest rates are needed to slow economic activity. Forecasters said data showing more than 300,000 jobs were added in August might reinforce support for a bigger rate hike.