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AP
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An Indonesian police chief and nine elite officers have been removed from their posts and 18 others are being investigated for responsibility in the firing of tear gas inside a soccer stadium that set off a stampede, killing at least 125 people. At least 17 children are among the dead and seven are being treated in hospitals. Most of the deaths occurred when riot police fired tear gas to prevent fans from protesting their home team's loss. It triggered a crush of spectators making a panicked run for the exits. Most of the victims were trampled or suffocated. The disaster Saturday night was among the deadliest ever at a sporting event.

AP
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Dicky Kurniawan felt the sharp sting in his eyes as Indonesian police fired tear gas into the football stadium. From his seat near an exit, he said he watched the melee unfold Saturday night as angry fans poured into the field to demand answers after host Arema FC suffered its first defeat ever on its home turf. The mob threw bottles and other objects, and the violence spread outside the stadium, where police cars were overturned and torched. As the tear gas spread through the stadium, Kurniawan grabbed his girlfriend and — like everyone else — dashed to the exits. The mass rush led to a stampede that killed 125 and injured hundreds. From his hospital bed, Kurniawan says he was fortunate to survive.

AP
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A women makes a phone call as she holds a picture of a victim of a soccer stampede provided by volunteers for identification purpose, at a hospital in Malang, East Java, Indonesia, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2022. Panic at an Indonesian soccer match Saturday left a number of people dead, most of whom were trampled to death after police fired tear gas to prevent violence. (AP Photo/Dicky Bisinglasi)

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Police firing tear gas after an Indonesian soccer match in an attempt to stop violence triggered a disastrous crush of fans. At least 125 people died, most of them trampled or suffocated. It happened in East Java province after Persebaya Surabaya beat Arema Malang 3-2 on Saturday night. It was among the deadliest disasters ever at a sporting event.

AP
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Police firing tear gas after an Indonesian soccer match in an attempt to stop violence triggered a disastrous crush of fans that has left at least 125 people dead. Attention immediately focused on police crowd-control measures at Saturday night’s match between host Arema FC of East Java’s Malang city and Persebaya Surabaya. Witnesses described officers beating them with sticks and shields before shooting tear gas canisters directly into the crowds. President Joko Widodo ordered an investigation of security procedures and the president of FIFA called the deaths “a dark day for all involved in football and a tragedy beyond comprehension.” While FIFA has no control over domestic games, it has advised against the use of tear gas at soccer stadiums.

AP
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Violence, tear gas and a deadly crush that erupted following a domestic league soccer match Saturday night marked another tragedy in Indonesian football. Emotions often run high for sports fans, and Indonesia is no stranger to soccer violence. Saturday's chaos occurred when a disappointing loss led to fans throwing objects and swarming the soccer pitch, then to police firing tear gas, which led to a crush of people trying to escape. At least 125 have died. Indonesia’s soccer association has banned host team Arema from hosting matches for the remainder of the season.

AP
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A women breaks down after receiving confirmation that her family member is among those killed in a soccer riots, at a hospital in Malang, East Java, Indonesia, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2022. Panic at an Indonesian soccer match Saturday left over 150 people dead, most of whom were trampled to death after police fired tear gas to dispel the riots. (AP Photo/Dicky Bisinglasi)

AP
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A plain-clothed police officer inspects a police car wrecked in soccer riots at Kanjuruhan Stadium in Malang, East Java, Indonesia, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2022. Panic at an Indonesian soccer match Saturday left over 150 people dead, most of whom were trampled to death after police fired tear gas to dispel the riots. (AP Photo/Trisnadi)

AP
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People looking for their family members inspect photographs of soccer riot victims provided by volunteers to help them identify their relatives in Malang, East Java, Indonesia, Sunday, Oct. 2, 2022. Panic at an Indonesian soccer match Saturday left over 150 people dead, most of whom were trampled to death after police fired tear gas to dispel the riots. (AP Photo/Dicky Bisinglasi)

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Saturday marks five years since a gunman rained bullets into an outdoor country music festival crowd on the Las Vegas Strip. The grim drumbeat of mass shootings has only continued in the years since, from New York to Colorado to Texas. Northeastern University professor James Alan Fox oversees a database maintained by The Associated Press, USA Today and Northeastern University and says there's also been a horrifying uptick in the number of mass shootings with an especially high number of people killed. The news takes a toll on survivors of the Las Vegas slaying, but a strong sense of community has also developed.