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FILE - Steel and concrete containers used for dry storage of spent fuel at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah nuclear plant near Chattanooga, Tenn., are shown to the media during a Friday Jan. 13, 2012 tour. As climate change pushes states in the U.S. to dramatically cut their use of fossil fuels, many are coming to the conclusion that solar, wind and other renewable power sources won't be enough to keep the lights on. Nuclear power is emerging as an answer to fill the gap as states transition away from coal, oil and natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of a warming planet. (AP Photo/ Bill Poovey, File)

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FILE - One of Pacific Gas and Electric's Diablo Canyon Power Plant's nuclear reactors is photographed on Nov. 3, 2008, in Avila Beach, Calif. As climate change pushes states in the U.S. to dramatically cut their use of fossil fuels, many are coming to the conclusion that solar, wind and other renewable power sources won't be enough to keep the lights on. Nuclear power is emerging as an answer to fill the gap as states transition away from coal, oil and natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of a warming planet. (AP Photo/Michael A. Mariant, File)

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FILE - Peter Galbraith displays his opposition to a proposal to waive an environmental review of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power plant before renewing the plant's license, Tuesday, June 28, 2016, in Sacramento, Calif. As climate change pushes states in the U.S. to dramatically cut their use of fossil fuels, many are coming to the conclusion that solar, wind and other renewable power sources won't be enough to keep the lights on. Nuclear power is emerging as an answer to fill the gap as states transition away from coal, oil and natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of a warming planet. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

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FILE - Framed by the Manhattan skyline electricians with IBEW Local 3 install solar panels on top of the Terminal B garage at LaGuardia Airport, Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2021, in the Queens borough of New York. As climate change pushes states in the U.S. to dramatically cut their use of fossil fuels, many are coming to the conclusion that solar, wind and other renewable power sources won't be enough to keep the lights on. Nuclear power is emerging as an answer to fill the gap as states transition away from coal, oil and natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of a warming planet. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

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FILE - Three of Deepwater Wind's five turbines stand in the water off Block Island, R.I, the nation's first offshore wind farm on Aug. 15, 2016. As climate change pushes states in the U.S. to dramatically cut their use of fossil fuels, many are coming to the conclusion that solar, wind and other renewable power sources won't be enough to keep the lights on. Nuclear power is emerging as an answer to fill the gap as states transition away from coal, oil and natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of a warming planet. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)

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TerraPower's Michael Anderson, manager of test engineers and technicians, talks about the large periodic table on the wall overhead during a tour of the nuclear reactor development facility, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. TerraPower plans to make its plant useful for today's energy grid with ever more renewable power. A salt heat "battery" will allow a nuclear plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting dips in electricity when the wind isn't blowing and sun isn't shining. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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TerraPower's Michael Anderson, manager of test engineers and technicians, stands in front of sodium loops used to test instruments during a tour of the nuclear reactor development facility, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. TerraPower plans to make its plant useful for today's energy grid with ever more renewable power. A salt heat "battery" will allow a nuclear plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting dips in electricity when the wind isn't blowing and sun isn't shining. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

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TerraPower's Michael Anderson, manager of test engineers and technicians, holds a glass jar holding purified salt during a tour of the nuclear reactor development facility, Thursday, Jan. 13, 2022, in Everett, Wash. TerraPower plans to make its plant useful for today's energy grid with ever more renewable power. A salt heat "battery" will allow a nuclear plant to ramp up electricity production on demand, offsetting dips in electricity when the wind isn't blowing and sun isn't shining. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)