Letter: Correcting the corrections

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Editor of the Reformer,

This note is in reference to a letter to the editor of the Reformer published Friday, June 28, 2020, headlined "Historically inaccurate attack on Ethan Allen." The missive purported to address perceived inaccuracies in a previous letter of June 18, "The Allen brothers are symbols of wrong done to Abenaki." Without belaboring the politics, I must cry foul on a few of the respondent's assertions, made to bolster the tarnished reputation of a justifiably-deflated folk hero. The response is rife with its own inaccuracies. It is indeed good to "learn abut history" and then work toward positive change.

1. Allen's sending of Capt. Daniel Nimham, Stockbridge Mohican, to the Seven Nations in May 1775, wasn't as much to recruit the Abenaki to the American side as it was to assure their neutrality. Further, the emissaries never made it to Caughnawaga; they were captured, convicted as spies, and nearly hung. Ethan Allen never was a true friend of the Abenaki; when members of the Missisquoi band returned to Swanton after the war, Allen ran them off, claiming it belonged to him.

2. The writer continues to work the Stockbridge Mohican angle - for some reason - claiming their territory ran up Lake Champlain to Missisquoi and east to Middlebury Center. Rather, it is widely understood - including by the Native nations themselves - that Mohican homelands meet those of the Abenaki near the juncture of lakes George and Champlain - nearly 100 miles further south.

3. The Stockbridge Mohican brigade never fought at the Battle of Bennington. They set off for the engagement late, and upon receiving word, turned back to their homes to (sadly) fight another day elsewhere.

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4. Vermont's granting in 1781 of what became Marshfield, Vermont to the Stockbridge for war services rendered was no solace or gain; they immediately were forced to trade it for debt payment to Capt. Isaac Marsh, tavern-keeper back in Stockbridge. For their troubles, most of the tribe eventually found themselves displaced 750 miles to the west.

5. Ethan Allen went before the Continental Congress in person more than once. Examples are easily documented: On June 23, 1775, Allen with Seth Warner appeared in Philadelphia to ask that the Green Mountain Boys be recognized as a regiment.

6. The Green Mountain Boys, in their several iterations, cannot be conflated with Roger's Rangers, but there certainly was significant overlap. Members of Allen's original Boys as well as former Rangers served together in Warner's Extra-Continental Regiment in the Revolution.

Rich Holschuh,

Brattleboro, June 29


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