Yellow Barn gathers audiences for weekend concerts

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PUTNEY — The third week of Yellow Barn's 49th anniversary season brings concerts to the Big Barn on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights, July 19-21, plus a lunch and open house on Yellow Barn's campus at the Greenwood School on Saturday as well as an evening discussion at the Putney Public Library.

The Saturday night show opens with a joyous call — Christopher Rouse's virtuosic Compline for flute, clarinet, harp, and string quartet (the same instrumentation as Ravel's Introduction and Allegro). Schubert's Fantasie in F Minor for piano four-hands follows. After intermission, Alexander Raskatov's Monk's Music, Seven Words by Starets Silouan (In memoriam Mieczyslaw Weinberg) receives its North American premiere. In Monk's Music, baritone William Sharp sings seven stanzas from the writings of Starets Silouan, a Russian monk also known as Saint Siloun, between the seven movements for string quartet. Monk's Music is modelled on Haydn's The Seven Last Words of Christ, which will be performed at Yellow Barn on the August 4 matinee concert. Cellists Natasha Brofsky and Jean-Michel Fonteneau discuss this relationship in a pre-concert discussion at 7pm at the Putney Public Library.

Earlier on Saturday, Yellow Barn invites audiences to its annual Open House on campus at the Greenwood School. Before attending open rehearsals, audiences are invited to share a meal with Yellow Barn's international community of musicians. Lunch costs $10, and there is no admission fee for the open rehearsals. Repertoire will be announced by Thursday.

Thursday's concert juxtaposes the lyrical with the fragmented. The evening begins with Cambodian composer Chinary Ung's Spiral for cello (Natasha Brofsky), piano, and percussion. Ravel's String Quartet in F Major follows, a flowing and lyrical piece that contrasts with Spiral. The second half begins with Brazilian composer Alexandre Lunsqui's Deflectere II, a pointillistic piece that sonically recalls Spiral. The program ends with Vaughan Williams' Piano Quintet in C Minor, a sweeping romantic work that was rediscovered just 19 years ago. On Friday night, July 20, Yellow Barn celebrates the 100th anniversary of Bernstein's birthday with the composer's Arias and Barcarolles for soprano, baritone (William Sharp), and piano four-hands. Beginning the program is Shulamit Ran's Moon Songs, a piece in four acts that features texts in both English and Hebrew. The Bernstein and Ran bookend the concert, a relationship that is made more special by the fact that Bernstein was Ran's mentor. Ran was even featured on one of Bernstein's televised Young People's Concerts in 1963. Also featured on the program are works by two Hungarian composers: Bart k's Violin Sonata No.2, which draws heavily on folk music idioms, and Kurt g's 12 Microludes for String Quartet. Britten's String Quartet No.1 rounds out the program.

Yellow Barn continues its tradition of restaurant nights: On Thursday nights, complimentary tickets are offered to concert goers at J.D. McCliment's Pub in Putney, on Friday at Duo in Brattleboro, and on Saturday at the Four Columns Inn. (Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.) Also on Saturday night Yellow Barn honors its business partners, whose support makes the summer season possible.

All concerts take place in the Big Barn. Concerts are at 8 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Patrons can purchase tickets by calling the Box Office at 802-387-6637, by emailing info@yellowbarn.org, or by visiting www.yellowbarn.org. Advance reservations are encouraged for guaranteed admission. Senior and student discounts available.

Yellow Barn's 49th anniversary season continues through August 4 with 29 events taking place in the Big Barn in Putney. Visit Yellow Barn on social media for an inside look at the festival, and check out the Blog for updates on Yellow Barn locally, across the United States, and internationally.

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